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The General Crisis is dead; long live the Little Divergence!

The General Crisis of the Seventeenth Century is an expression that refers to several efforts to supply early modern history with a new organizing principle. They seek to account for the decisive entry of Europe, or a part of it, to a recognizable modernity. Resistance to these efforts has been motivated, in part, to the claims of other historical “turning points” to act as the portal to modernity. For some time, all efforts to “explain” modernity, or to impose master narratives in general, has been out of fashion, and interest in the crisis waned. But over the past fifteen years, the influence of global history and the concept of the Great Divergence has revived interest in the early modern period as the locus of a fundamental parting of ways. Do these new studies have implications for the general crisis?

The Granville Times

Created by Ryan Taylor. This video is a digital project completed as part of Professor Lilia Fernandez's History 4015: Research in Modern U.S. History course at Ohio State University in the spring of 2015. 

The Great Stock Market Crash

Created by Julianna Patterson-Blight. 

This video is a digital project completed as part of Professor Lilia Fernandez's History 4015: Research in Modern U.S. History course in the spring of 2015.

The History of "Radical" Movements in Islam

Presented by Jane Hathaway, Professor of History at The Ohio State University, to the Clio Society on April 18, 2016. This talk addresses the historical origins of key “radical” -- or, more appropriately, puritanical or revivalist -- movements in Sunni Islam. The focus is on two main strands of Sunni revivalism: Wahhabism, which originated in the mid-18th century, and the Muslim Brotherhood, which originated in the early 20th century. Both these tendencies seek to root out innovations to the practice of the original Muslim community in the 7th century, but what they regard as innovations and the ways in which they attempt to eradicate them vary widely. Discussion includes a number of groups and movements that have been in the news in recent years, including Hamas, al-Qaeda, and ISIS.

The Kinsey Report

The eHistory MultiMedia Course Projects were developed by students in Professor Judy Wu's History course 525 in 2008 and 2009. This MultiMedia History explores the media's role in shaping American sexuality by focusing on the Kinsey reports of the 1950s. What was an unknown, dry, scientific study became a well-known literary sensation, helped along by national attention by various media outlets.

The Longest Day: The Allied Invasion of Normandy

Peter Mansoor, U.S. Army (Retired) and the General Raymond E. Mason Jr. Chair of Military History at Ohio State, discusses the D-Day Invasion itself and how the four Allied powers worked together to establish a foothold on the European continent. This presentation was part of the "Remembering D-Day: A 70th Anniversary Commemoration" held by The Ohio State University Department of History in June 2014.

The Louisiana Purchase in the Age of Revolution

Created and developed by Erin Greenwald

In April of 1803 the United States acquired more than eight hundred thousand square miles of territory from France in what has come to be known as the largest real estate transaction in history. France’s cession of the Louisiana territory nearly doubled the size of the United States and guaranteed America’s economic and physical expansion across the Mississippi River Valley and beyond.

The Man behind the Atomic Bomb

Created by Ryan O'Donnell. This video is a digital project completed as part of Professor Lilia Fernandez's History 4015: Research in Modern U.S. History course at Ohio State University in the spring of 2015.

The Murder of Marilyn Sheppard

Created by Anna Holdren. This video is a digital project completed as part of Professor Lilia Fernandez's History 4015: Research in Modern U.S. History course at Ohio State University in the spring of 2015.

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