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The ambitions of government: Territoriality and infrastructural power in ancient Rome

Presented by Clifford Ando, University of Chicago, at the Center for Historical Research, Department of History at The Ohio State University on January 31, 2014. The last thirty years have been much fluctuation in the estimation of ancient empires as regards assessment of both their power and style of governance. Did ancient empires formulate and implement policies, or was ancient government largely reactive? Did they have the power or aspiration to penetrate deep into the territories they ruled, or were they content to rule through the cooptation of local elites and pre-existing institutions? Related inquiries have been launched into the importance of territoriality to ancient states, as well as the relationship between territoriality and imperialism: did Rome, or Persia, for that matter, recognize or materially mark firm borders of its control? Did their practice differ in regard to borders between administrative units within the empire? For that matter, when did ancient terms like imperium or provincia, "power of command" and "bailiwick," take on notions of spatial extension such that they could come to mean "empire" and "province?" These questions, which have scarcely been resolved, have taken on new urgency in light of the importance comparison has assumed in contemporary (ancient) empire studies.

The Chicago Race Riot of 1919

Created by Nick Huffmon. This video is a digital project completed as part of Professor Lilia Fernandez's History 4015: Research in Modern U.S. History course at Ohio State University in the spring of 2015.

The Democracy That Broke: The Continuing Relevance of the Civil War

Presented by Mark Grimsley, Associate Professor of History, at the Clio Society meeting, May 2012.
Extremism in American political life led to the extreme actions that caused the Civil War. The Civil War challenged the idea that America was an "unbreakable union," as that union was torn asunder. Could the extremism that seems to characterize our politics today similarly tear our union asunder? During this, the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, Professor Mark Grimsley reflects upon the War's continuing significance in American political life.

The Effect of the State

Keynote presented by Timothy Mitchell, Columbia University on Sept. 20, 2013 at the Center for Historical Research, Department of History at The Ohio State University.

The Efforts and Effects of the Social Hygiene Movement in WW I

The eHistory MultiMedia Course Projects were developed by students in Professor Judy Wu's History course 525 in 2008 and 2009. This project studies the efforts and affects of the social hygiene movement during World War I along with how the movement influenced the movement for sexual hygiene in World War I.

The Eve of D-Day: Possibilities and Roads Not Taken

Keynote Address of "Remembering D-Day: A 70th Anniversary Commemoration" at the Department of History, The Ohio State University, delivered by Williamson Murray, academic program fellow at the Potomac Institute and Professor Emeritus of History at Ohio State, June 2014. This talk explores the alternate options open to the Allies on the eve of D-Day and how different decisions could have influenced the outcome of the invasion, as well as the war itself.

The Family from 10,000 BCE to the Present

Presented by Professors Ann Waltner and Mary Jo Maynes, University of Minnesota on Oct. 9, 2015 at the Center for Historical Research at The Ohio State University Department of History. Their talk draws upon their co-authored book, "The Family: A World History" which is described as, "Mary Jo Maynes and Ann Waltner tell the story of this fundamental unit from the beginnings of domestication and human settlement. They consider the codification of rules governing marriage in societies around the ancient world, the changing conceptions of family wrought by the heightened pace of colonialism and globalization in the modern world, and how state policies shape families today."

The Founding of Modern States

Presented by Richard Bensel, Cornell University, at the Center for Historical Research, Department of History at The Ohio State University on March 27, 2015.

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