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The ambitions of government: Territoriality and infrastructural power in ancient Rome

Presented by Clifford Ando, University of Chicago, at the Center for Historical Research, Department of History at The Ohio State University on January 31, 2014. The last thirty years have been much fluctuation in the estimation of ancient empires as regards assessment of both their power and style of governance. Did ancient empires formulate and implement policies, or was ancient government largely reactive? Did they have the power or aspiration to penetrate deep into the territories they ruled, or were they content to rule through the cooptation of local elites and pre-existing institutions? Related inquiries have been launched into the importance of territoriality to ancient states, as well as the relationship between territoriality and imperialism: did Rome, or Persia, for that matter, recognize or materially mark firm borders of its control? Did their practice differ in regard to borders between administrative units within the empire? For that matter, when did ancient terms like imperium or provincia, "power of command" and "bailiwick," take on notions of spatial extension such that they could come to mean "empire" and "province?" These questions, which have scarcely been resolved, have taken on new urgency in light of the importance comparison has assumed in contemporary (ancient) empire studies.

The Chicago Race Riot of 1919

Created by Nick Huffmon. This video is a digital project completed as part of Professor Lilia Fernandez's History 4015: Research in Modern U.S. History course at Ohio State University in the spring of 2015.

The Democracy That Broke: The Continuing Relevance of the Civil War

Presented by Mark Grimsley, Associate Professor of History, at the Clio Society meeting, May 2012.
Extremism in American political life led to the extreme actions that caused the Civil War. The Civil War challenged the idea that America was an "unbreakable union," as that union was torn asunder. Could the extremism that seems to characterize our politics today similarly tear our union asunder? During this, the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, Professor Mark Grimsley reflects upon the War's continuing significance in American political life.

The Effect of the State

Keynote presented by Timothy Mitchell, Columbia University on Sept. 20, 2013 at the Center for Historical Research, Department of History at The Ohio State University.

The Efforts and Effects of the Social Hygiene Movement in WW I

The eHistory MultiMedia Course Projects were developed by students in Professor Judy Wu's History course 525 in 2008 and 2009. This project studies the efforts and affects of the social hygiene movement during World War I along with how the movement influenced the movement for sexual hygiene in World War I.

The Equal Rights Amendment: Then and Now (a History Talk podcast)

In March 2017 Nevada became the first state in 40 years to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment—a provision written to address discrimination on the basis of sex. Now, in an atmosphere of renewed national attention on issues affecting women, this proposed amendment could be just two states short of addition to the United States Constitution. Explore the long history of the ERA with hosts Jessica Blissit and Brenna Miller as they speak with three historians: Kimberly Hamlin, Susan Hartmann, and Katherine Marino.

The EU: Past, Present, Future (a History Talk podcast)

On this episode of History Talk, hosts Patrick Potyondy and Mark Sokolsy sit down with Donald Hempson, Lauren Henry, and Chris Otter to discuss the history of the European Union, an organization that has united Europeans in ways that were almost unthinkable a century ago. Today, the EU faces an unprecedented combination of challenges, including a lingering economic crisis, a massive influx of migrants, and the specter of terrorism.

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