January 20, 1867

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January 20, 1867

Lebanon, Ala, January the 20th, 1867

Miss Lizzi Hackworth,

            Dear Cousin it is through the kind providence of God that I this blessed sabbath evening seat myself to write a few lines in answer to yours of the 6th Dec, which gave me much satisfaction as I had almost got out of patience waiting for an answer from you[.] Your appology is a very good one and I will excuse you for not writing sooner, and I will also make an appology  myself[.]  I received your letter the 31st of Dec and the next day started South with a load of apples and was gone until the 13th and have been busy ever since, so you see I’ve had but little time to write.  Dear cousin this is a quiet but impressing sabbath day, when I awoke from my bed of slumber this morning and looked out over the valey and beheld the whole earth shrouded in snow.  I was made to reflect on the past and meditate on the omnipotence of that God who doeth the thing for our good and by in whos hand our lives are spare or taken as the sees best.  Dear cousin is it not a pleasant thing to view the earth arrayed in white and the trees of the forest as it were bowing with reverence to the creator, but enough on that subject[.]  You write for me to let you know how father & and mother health was, they are in tolerably health at this time[.]  Mother had a very severe attack of chills fever[.]  She has been improving very fast and is know able to do light work but tolerbly weak yet[.]  The rest of the family are well[.] Sister Martha & brother Dobbs were up to see us and left here the first of this month for the montevallo circuit (that is the same that they traveled last year[.])  They were in tolerbly good health[.]  Sister was sick a good portion of her time last year.  We have also hear from them since then[.]  They arrived at Montevallo and they we well then.  Lizzi there is but little news of interest in this country.  Religion is at a low ebb, politics unsettled, marriages are of dayly day occurance[.]  There has been a great change since I was there in that particular.  Dear cousin I was very sorry to hear that cousin Joseph Golston had the misfortune of loosing one of his children[.]  You will please let me know in your next letter which one it was that died.  Wm gave me no name;  you wrote that cousin Wm Rigney intended going west[.]  I have heard by Mr. Woodall who has just come from where he lives that he has is already on his way westward[.]  You will please let me know if he came up to see y[ou} before he left and if so how his family were[.] When times are some better in this country than they have been though money is very scarce and hard to get here, corn is $1.50cts per bushel Wheat $2.00 per bushel, pork 1-cts per lb &co.  Cousin we have a very fine prospect for a good school at Portersville this year.  Mr. Patterson who is a very good teacher will commence the first monday in February withy 32 subscribers and some 12 or 15 boarders expected[.]  I think there will [be] at least 50 scholars.  William and I will go first session brother Emory will farm it take charge of the farm this year with some hired help.  Dear cousin, I would like to see you and the rest of the connection but if you do not come down I am sure not to see you this spring.  I must close[.]  Give my best respects to all. Tell cousin Sarah Golston I have not received an answer from her yet, and I am getting very impatient to hear from her[.]  Tell Wm and Levi to write.

 I remain your affectionate cousin,

H. B. Williams

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