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No. 30 1865

Montgomery, Ala April 28th

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My Dear Wife, Father, Mother and sisters

After so long a time I again have the pleasure of writing to you.

The last letter I wrote was No. 29 � to Hortense. In that I stated that you need not look for

a letter for two weeks so I hope you have not worried about me. We left Blakely on the

13th and marched ten miles and went into camp. The next day the 33rd was rear guard and we did

not start until 12 m and had to march 15 miles after that time. We did not go into camp til about 11 o'clock and by the time we got through supper it was after 12. We were ordered to start the next morning by 4 a m which we did and we marched 18 miles before we stopped. It rained very hard during the night and I was very tired but had to start Sunday morning at � past 4 and marched before night 21 miles to the Escambia River. Only 8 of our Co. came in with the regt. The rest were played out. Ike & I were among the number who came in. I was very tired and foot sore but after my body was rested up my soul kept marching.

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on. We pontooned the Escambia and then marched nine miles and camped. I had a good swim that night and rested very well but my feet were blistered very bad and pained mi me very much. The next day we marched 18 miles and here we had a good supper for Ike killed a sheep. Most of the boys are used up and as half our rations had been cut off before we left Fish river we were hungry. All we had so far on the march was one pound of bread � pound of meat to each man and 15 pounds of sugar & 15 of coffee to each 100 men for a days ration(?). It was slim fare I tell you. The next day (the 19th) we marched 17 miles. I had to fall out this day for I could not keep up my feet were so sore. The 29th our regt were rear guard again, and we only marched 10 miles. The boys stole some hams so we had meat enough for supper. On the 21st we were up

at three and on the march by four. It rained all day long but we mack made 21 miles by 4 PM. We were all used up for we had to wade through the mud ankle deep most of the way and waist sleff deep in water some of the time. We camped near Greenville and laid there one day. Here we were cut down to one half rations of bread and meat and coffee. On the 23rd we left Greenville and marched 18 miles

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We foraged two hams, three hogs (fresh) and some meal so we made out very well for sup

per. On the 24th we marched 10 miles and on the 25 we came into Montgomery and beyond(?)

making a distance of 23 miles. I was about used up. We expected to find our transports here but they have not come up yet and we are living on corn meal & salt and nothing else. We had but little fighting coming here. In fact none at all after the first day or two. Major AA Anderson was wounded one day when we were advanced guard and he was the only man we lost on the trip. We were 12 days on the march and averaged over 15 miles each day which is three d miles more per day than Shermans army made on the march from Atlanta to Savannah and while they had all they wanted to eat we had only half as much. Howiver(sic) our march was not as long into 65 miles and we accomplished nothing by coming. The City is strongly fortified but we found no

enemy to hinder us. Since coming in we have heard that Lee has surrendered to Grant and that there is an armistis (sic) of 20 days. Something is up for the rebel pickets do not fire on our men and they say they have been ordered not to. I hope peace will be made. The south is whipped and

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may as well give up and stop bloodshed. I am anxious to hear from you all. It seems so long since I had a letter. I am in hopes to be at home in three months and if all the rumors are true I will be. If I could only see some papers it would do me good but we are out of the world. This was the first Confederate Capital and it is the place where the Confederate Constitution was written. It is also the place where they egged Douglas several years ago when he was "looking

for his mother." It is about the size of Galesburg and is a very pretty place. Ike & George are

well. I will write to you again soon. I do not know when this will go out but I will have it ready. Kiss the little ones for me. Love to all from yours ever.

John M. Follett