Page 3731

3731 THE TWENTIETH CENTURY-THE GREAT WAR,

in connection with the arrest of Dr.

Edward A. Rumely on charges of buying

the New York Evening Mail with money

furnished by the German Government

and of later making false statements

concerning its ownership. The Mail subsequent to its purchase had been notable

for its pro-German activities.

After the United States entered the

conflict German propaganda sought to

discredit our aims and to make light

of our power, both in neutral countries

and even among the Allied peoples. The

Germans were particularly active in such

countries as Mexico, Spain, and Russia.

They continued to spend millions of dollars

and hesitated at nothing that would help

to accomplish their end. They bribed

newspapers, lecturers, and public men,

purchased moving picture theaters and

supplied others with films designed to

influence those who saw them in favor

of Germany.

The Americans were described as a

nation of dollar-grabbers wholly destitute

of ideals and thoroughly selfish. In Mexico we were represented as desiring to

conquer the country. Pershing's expedition in pursuit of Villa was pictured

as having had for its purpose the seizure

of Mexico, an attempt that failed because

we had been intimidated by the "dauntless" courage of President Carranza. In

Spain the memories of the War of 1898

were revived, and every effort was made

to cause the Spaniards to distrust and

hate America. In France we were represented as being the secret agent of Great

Britain; in Great Britain, as playing the

game for France. In Italy an attempt

was made to convince the Italians that

we were neglecting them, and newspapers