War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0612 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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above referred to will be paid for at establish rates. Hereafter supplies will be obtained, as far as practicable, by purchase, and when necessary by impressment; and officers, when authorized to resort to impressment, will observe strictly the requirements of law and the general orders of the War Department and the regulations of this office founded thereon.

II. That any officer who shall be authorized by the act of Congress concerning impressments, or under the regulations of this department pursuant thereto, which have been or may hereafter be made, and who has given the notice required by the same, shall have full power and authority to enter upon any property in which he shall have good reason to suspect any of the articles of produce, goods, merchandise, or other things subject to impressment may be stored or concealed, in order to obtain or secure the same; ad if he shall have reason to believe that they are stored or concealed in any dwelling house, store-house, or other building, to which he is refused access, he may apply to any judge, justice of the peace, or commissioner of a Confederate court for a warrant to enter upon the same upon oath of the facts, and describing the objects stored or concealed, and obtain a warrant to search for and secure the same, which warrant shall only be executed in the daytime and after demand of the owner or occupant, if the owner or occupant shall then be inhabiting the building aforesaid.

By order:

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, No. 93.

Richmond, June 30, 1863.

Paragraph I, General Orders, No. 49, current series, is so amended that the appraisement of deceased soldiers' clothing shall be made after it has been washed and put in condition by the quartermaster, and will approximate to the Government prices or rates at which it was originally issued.

By order:

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Montgomery, Ala., June 30, 1863.

GENERAL: The Governor is in receipt of yours of the 20th, but has been so pressed by matters growing out of the recent call that he has been obliged to turn it over to this office. In relation to the guns he submits the matter to your sound discretion, expressing his satisfaction at learning that your division is so well supplied. I am inclined to think that it is the same in the other sections of the State, although perhaps not to the same extent. It is certain, however, that first and last more than 60,000 men have gone into service from Alabama, and I should think, upon a reasonable calculation, full one-half must have left guns at home. It is very certain that the State has not got many