War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0489 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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State, while their people desired and their Government proposed the commercial intercourse, provided cotton, &c., could not be obtained by smuggling.

I believe now the wisest and best course which existing circumstance suggest to prevent the plantin of excessive crops, incur the capture of cereals, sustain the public credit, prevent speculation, extortion, and riots for bread-a measure entirely consistent with constitution liberty, conducive to the general welfare, and to the independence of the Confederate States-would be an act of Congress prohibiting, under severe penalties, and commercial intercourse with foreign nations, except such as should be authorized by the Government through special agents, and exclusively for the purposes of Government. If trade between our citizens and the speculators who succeed in running the blockade was prevented, all inducements to make cotton except for the benefit of the Government in its negotiations and for domestic users would be cut offal; individual energy and enterprise and enlightened public sentiment would insure the necessities and even the comforts of life to the people and to the armies, the Confederate currency would be independent in itself for all the purposes of commerce between the State, individuals, and the Confederate Government, as there would be no demand for special or foreign exchange to sustain our domestic commerce. Thus inducements to speculation and extortion would be destroyed, our peopled would depend on themselves, and the Confederate Government would reflect the intelligence and probity of an independent and self-sustaining association of States.

Experience may suggest the propriety, justice, and necessity of an additional act of Congress to remove from the Confederate States all persons who claim to be aliens and therefore exempt from and refuse to volunteer into the militia service of the Confederate States. The number of person who consume and speculate upon our labor would be greatly diminished and the State would be relieved of the most dangerous element which threatens public safety, a class of men who contribute nothing to our agricultural prosperity, but who line and speculate upon our agricultural products, and basely refuse to aid in the defense of that labor by which they not only subsist but accumulate.

The opinions herein expressed are most respectfully submitted to your consideration.

I have the honor to be, respectfully,

JOHN MILTON,

Governor of Florida.

P. S. - Inclosed you will find a circular sent to me by mail. I have no idea who the author is; but that an effort is being made to organize a political party which will prove trouble some if not dangerous to the permanency and prosperity of the Confederate States I have but little doubt.

JOHN MILTON.

[Inclosure.]

Annexation of the Northwest.

"P. W. A.," the popular army correspondent of the Savannah Republican, writes to that paper from Charleston under date of March 12, as follows:

The opinion prevails in political circular that an effort will be made bring out a ticket in opposition to the Confederate Administration in your approaching State elections.