War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0433 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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They do not report to me for instructions, nor do they regard discharges on surgeons' certificates from the camp, saying they are not good.

M. R. CLARK,

Major, &c.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, Va., February 13, 1863.

General BRAGG,

Tullahoma, Ten.:

Lieutenant-Colonel Blake, commandant of conscripts for Tennessee, telegraphs that he has received special orders, militating against his regular instructions, from General Pillow, calling himself chief of a conscript bureau. The War Department exercises through the Bureau created for the purpose exclusive control of the whole subject of conscription. Its officers are not liable to orders, and no interference can be exerted from any other source without its special sanction in the particular case. If any officer otherwise appointed is styling himself an officer of conscription, or acting as such, the confusion thus created should be immediately ended. The only authority that is or can be delegated for recruiting is to regimental officers for accepting volunteers or gathering conscripts not yet in custody of regular enrolling officers.

By order of the Secretary of War:

J. A. CAMPBELL,

Assistant Secretary of War.

(Same sent to General Pillow (care of General Joseph E. Johnston), Tullahoma, Ten. ; General Colston, commanding, Petersburg; Colonels Shields, Blake, Preston, August, and Majors Swanson and Clark.)

[Inclosure No. 3.]

Instructions for the government of officers of this bureau.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. VOL. AND CONSCRIPT BUREAU, ARMY OF TENNESSEE, No. 96.

Huntsville, February 16, 1863.

This bureau is organized to enforce the law. Its officers and agents have no power to suspend or to enlarge its provisions. Their duty is to enforce it, and this must be done.

Between the ages of thirty-five and forty there are many exemptions. These must be allowed where the parties in good faith are entitled to the exemptions. There are, however, many cases of fraudulent efforts to get the benefit of the law by parties trying to put themselves within its provisions who are not entitled to them. In all such cases the parties so acting must be put into the service.

Mechanics and manufactures must have been such and carrying on their trade or occupation when the law was passed, viz, on the 11th of October, 1862, and must keep on hand a supply of material necessary to keep up their shops and business and must not exceed in their charges 75 per cent. profit on the cost of manufacture. If they do they forfeit their exemptions, and all such must be put into the Army.

Such is the case with every trade and occupation exempted by law for the good of the service or the country.

28 R R-SERIES IV, VOL II