War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0403 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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upon which a slave or slaves may or shall be employed, shall not be liable to the penalty herein prescribed: Provided, The owner or proprietor manages his own affairs without the aid of an overseer.

SEC 3. Be it further enacted, That any and all laws or parts of laws inconsistent or conflicting with the provisions of this act be, and the same are hereby, repealed.

Passed the House of Representatives January 9, 1851. Passed the Senate January 17, 1851. Approved by the Governor January 22, 1851.

I certify that the above is a true copy of the act passed and approved as above stated, on file in the office of secretary of state.

In testimony whereof I have hereto set my hand and caused the great seal of the State to be affixed at the Capitol this the 16th day of February, A. D. 1863.

February, A. D. 1863.

By the Governor. Attest:

[SEAL.]

B. F. ALLEN,

Secretary of State.

CIRCULAR.] HDQRS. DEPT. O F THE MISS. AND EAST LOUISIANA,

Jackson, February 17, 1863.

The following is the indorsement of General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector General, upon certain inquiries as to the liability of Kentuckians to conscription, and is published for the information of all concerned:

The twelve-months' volunteers from Kentucky are embraced in the conscription acts, and are, therefore, liable to conscription at the expiration of their twelve months' service.

Kentucky is considered as a member of the Southern Confederacy, having its representation in the Congress of that Confederacy.

By the order of Lieutenant-General Pemberton.

R. W. MEMMINGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. VOL. AND CONSCRIPT BUREAU, ARMY OF TEN.,

Huntsville, Ala., February 17, 1863.

Hon. JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

Your telegram of the 15th instant directing me to order Captain Cobb back from the rendezvous at Fayetteville to this post is obeyed. I deem it proper in explanation to state the facts and the sense of duty under which I acted. With extreme reluctance I undertook to organize a bureau for the purpose of strengthening the Army of Tennessee and make it self-sustaining. The service was most distasteful and repugnant to my feelings. But being most urgently pressed by General Bragg to do so, and informed by him that unless his army was strengthened he could not hold Tennessee, I finally entered upon the work from a sense of duty to the country.

I have been engaged just one month and have added to the army, as I am informed by an officer direct from it, over 12,000 men. In this field organization I have met with many difficulties and embarrassments, not the least of which is the want of officers of the quartermaster and commissary staff to provide for the wants of the conscripts