War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0376 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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by the Articles of War and Regulations of the Army, in connection with the aforesaid act of October 9, 1862.

Their proceedings will therefore be subjected to review by the commanding general of the army corps to which they are attached, who, by the decision of the President, is the proper reviewing officer of all such proceedings, under the provisions of the law and the Articles of War. The original proceedings of these courts, after final action is had on them, will be transmitted to the office of the Adjutant and Inspector-General, agreeably to the ninetieth article of war.

By order:

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

RICHMOND, VA., January 27, 1863.

His Excellency JOHN GILL SHORTER,

Montgomery, Ala.:

SIR: Your letter forwarding a copy of the joint resolution of the Legislature of Alabama, expressing readiness to unite with other States in guaranteeing the debt of the Confederate Government proportionally to representation in Congress, has been received. I regard this as a most important step and feel grateful for its initiation. That the Government may be enabled to conduct the war to a speedy and honorable peace, it must have ample means and credit, and our financial system cannot fail to acquire the liberty [sic] from the policy you have inaugurated. Alabama has thus given another proof of the zeal and determination which have characterized her in the prosecution of the war for independence; and it is to be hoped that the other States will pursue the same course in reference to the public debt.

Very respectfully, yours,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

RICHMOND, VA., January 27, 1863.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN,

Milledgeville, Ga.:

SIR: I have received and read with interest your letter indorsing a copy of an act and joint resolution of the Legislature of Georgia, partially prohibiting the cultivation of cotton in the State during the continuance of the war, and urging upon planters the necessity for increased attention to the production of provisions. The inauguration of this policy affords me great gratification. This prompt and emphatic expression by the Legislature of the sentiment of the people of Georgia, it is to be hoped, will be met by the concurrent action of the other States upon the subject; and from the general adoption of the scheme we may anticipate the best results. The possibility of a short supply of provisions presents the greatest danger to a successful prosecution of the war. If we shall be able to furnish adequate subsistence to the Army during the coming seat defiance the worst efforts of our enemy. A general compliance by the farmers will be the guaranty of our independence.

Very respectfully, yours,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.