War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0371 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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The commanding general of the department will, I am sure, be as lenient as is proper, and mindful of the need we have that the fields be cultivated.

J. D.

GENERAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, No. 10. Richmond, January 24, 1863.

The following orders are published for the information of all concerned:

I. The duties of signal officers are confined to those bearing commissions as such, appointed under the acts of Congress approved April 19, 1862, and September 27, 1862.

II. To any general officer requiring a signal officer and entitled thereto, one will be assigned by the Adjutant and Inspector General.

III. All signal officers are required to make their reports, returns, &c., through the senior signal officer on duty at the seat of government, and paragraph IX, General Orders, No. 40, must be more strictly observed.

By order:

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

HEADQUARTERS VOLUNTEER AND CONSCRIPT BUREAU,

Shelbyville, January 25, 1863.

Colonel BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

To-day I have worked through six brigades; will continue the work to-morrow. Colonel Biffle's regiment has moved north in the field work, and will to-morrow rake this county from near the enemy's lines south. I have made provisions with General Wharton to cover the movement and protect the command. General Forrest is present and informs me that Dibrell's regiment is on the way through Marshall County to Fayetteville. I have sent a courier for him and will order him directly to the starting-ground to sweep the four corners of the counties referred to in my dispatch yesterday. I will then sweep over Williams and Maury. I applied to General Cheatham for an officer to carry forward my instructions to Tullahoma and place the details from that corps under working orders, but he declines allowing even for that temporary service any officer that I think equal to the work. I cannot put that duty on one in whom I have not full confidence. I see no alternative but to come forward myself, but it would have greatly advanced my work if he would have allowed me the use of a satisfactory officer. If I had the corps of Lieutenant-General Hardee under working orders I could see my work going on satisfactory. The general may rely on my doing all that it is possible to accomplish.

Respectfully,

GID. J. PILLOW,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army, and Chief of Bureau.