War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0109 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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not used for store-houses; that the roads using them be charged for their use, and that they are promptly returned, for from these causes arise three-fourths of the difficulties in transportation. It is also suggested that the right of seizing for the use of the government certain articles of absolute necessity, such as cloth, leather, &c., be granted when parties holding the articles will not sell them to the Government, or ask extortionate prices, the impressment to be made in conformity with the act of Congress on the subject. It does not occur to me that any further legislation is required to promote the efficiency of the Quartermaster's Department. Existing laws and orders are amply sufficient if officers do their duty. The prospect of clothing the Army from the resources of the Confederacy is very good. Wool is coming in abundance from Texas to be manufactured into cloth in Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina, Alabama, &c. The propriety of allowing leather and wool and manufactured clothing suitable for the Army to be brought into the Confederacy free of duty is respectfully submitted. Any questions the committee may desire to have answered the undersigned begs it will present.

Very respectfully,

A. C. MYERS,

Quartermaster-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, Va., October 4, 1862.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President Confederate States of America:

SIR: I deem it my duty to call your attention before the adjournment of Congress to the want of power in the Executive to make appointments when neither election nor promotion secures competent officers to fill vacancies, and to consolidate companies and regiments reduced by casualties of service below the numbers necessary for efficiency. The absence of this power is a defect in the organization of our service so great that it must ultimately cause disaster if not ruin.

The present condition of the Army of Northern Virginia imperatively requires its exercise, and the experience of the commanding general of that army has been unable to devise any expedient by which he may avoid the alternative of violating law or of exposing his army to ruin.

The present condition of the Army of Northern Virginia imperatively requires its exercise, and the experience of the commanding general for that army has been unable to devise any expedient by which he may avoid the alternative of violating law or of exposing his army to ruin.

The senior general of our armies, whose opinion is entitled to great respect from his familiar acquaintance with the military organizations of this continent during the last forty-five years, fully concurs with the Department as to the indispensable necessity of the proposed power.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

[OCTOBER 5, 1862. -For Milton to Randolph, in regard to the enforcement of the conscript act in Florida, &c., see Series I, VOL. LIII, p. 258.]