War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0096 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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enrolled and brought into service in the State of Georgia, but that the number of enrolling officers engaged in collecting the conscripts, and their cost to the Government, has not been reported.

It is proper to add that the Department, not being satisfied with the manner in which the duty of enrolling and collecting conscripts in Georgia has been conducted, has superseded Major John Dunwody, and assigned Lieut. Colonel B. Weems to the command of the conscript camp in that State.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

Resolved, That the Secretary of War be requested to inform the senate what has been the whole number of troops in the State of Georgia enrolled and brought into service by conscription; what has been the number of officers and men engaged in collecting said conscripts, and what has been their cost to the Government. If an answer cannot now be given with correctness and certainty an answer approximately requested.

OFFICE SECRETARY OF SENATE,

Richmond, September 16, 1862.

I hereby certify that the above resolution was adopted by the Senate to-day.

JAS. H. NASH,

Secretary.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, Va., September 26, 1862.

Colonel A. C. MYERS,

Quartermaster-General:

COLONEL: Governor Letcher informs me that there are a number of shoemakers in the penitentiary of Virginia who will be set a work for the Army if the Confederate Government will furnish the leather. Have you more leather than is necessary to employ your own workmen? If so, report the fact tome and I will make arrangements with the Governor to secure the services of the penitentiary. He requested me to communicate with him to-day. You will oblige me, therefore, by a speedy report. It has been suggested to me that sandals, or shoes like moccasins, might be made of rawhide in sufficient numbers to supply the temporary and immediate wants of the Army. If this is practicable the penitentiary hands might be profitably employed in the manufacture of such shoes. I must request that you will inquire into and report upon this matter without delay.

Dispatches from General Lee inform us that the army is in great want of shoes and clothing, and that its efficiently is impaired by its destitution in these particulars. I wish every possible exertion made to procure and forward supplies of clothing and shoes, especially of the latter article, and that everything else shall be for the present subordinate to the object.

Your obedient servant,

GEO. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

GENERAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, No. 71.

Richmond, September 26, 1862.

I. All persons who have made application for appointments in the Ordnance Corps since the meeting of the present Congress will present