War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0093 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

Search Civil War Official Records

appearance of a camp provided for those afflicted with lameness and diseases than a military camp, and I would most respectfully suggest that those in it physically able should be permitted forthwith to volunteer and aid in completing the incomplete organizations now here in Confederate service, and those who are not able to perform military service should be discharged and provided with the means of returning home.

I am much pleased with General Finegan. He is industrious and energetic, and superior in those respects to his predecessors, and we co-operate most agreeably; and although we occasionally differ in opinion, yet no unpleasantly. He has recommended that the ten companies of cavalry should be organized in a regiment and asked the privilege of raising more cavalry. I do not believe a regiment should be organized; that as independent companies they will be much more efficient, because, scattered as they are from one extreme of the department to the other, the captains of companies, feeling their exclusive responsibility, will be more vigilant and energetic, and when two or three companies shall be required to act together the senior captain could command. It has been seldom that any two companies have been associated upon duty; but, as eight of the companies have been in service a considerable time, and many of them reorganized under the conscript act, if made to compose a regiment they should be allowed to elect their field officers.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

JOHN MILTON,

Governor of Florida.

P. S. -Within the last four hours enrolling officers have reported to me that a greater number of men, able to perform military service, have evaded them than the number of men capable of being useful which they have enrolled, and that, moreover, those men cannot be brought into camps without force, which they will resist. Under existing circumstances a resort to force may lead to most injurious consequences. I do not hesitate to say that if permitted to come in as volunteers, within thirty days after authorized to receive them as volunteers, those who have assumed a hostile attitude will volunteer and make reliable soldiers and promptly move wherever ordered. In Washington County forty men have been enrolled, and I am informed only three can be brought into camp. Two weeks ago they were informed they would be received as volunteers, and twenty of them marched fifty miles and volunteered, and the rest were preparing to come when it was ascertained that the offer to receive them was the result of a telegraphic mistake, and the twenty escaped to their comrades. In connection with this subject your attention is respectfully invited to the within copy of a letter from me to our Senators and Representatives.

J. M.

[Inclosure.]

STATE OF FLORIDA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Tallahassee, September 11, 1862.

HONORABLE SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, RICHMOND, VA.:

GENTLEMEN: I have read the report of August 12, made by the Secretary of War to His Excellency Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States. You will excuse me, when you reflect upon the