War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0080 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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reported, with a recommendation for any special duty for which he may appear suited.

By order:

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

September 10, 1862.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS:

SIR: I have the honor of apprising you that the House of Representatives this morning adopted a resolution, of which the annexed is a copy:

Resolved, That the President be requested to inform the House, if not incompatible with the public interests, the number and kind of arms and equipments issued to troops in the field and not issued; the number and kind of arms manufactured per month in the Confederate States, with he average cost of such manufactured arms.

* * *

R. E. DIXON,

Clerk House of Representatives.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAS DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, September 10, 1862.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President Confederate States of America:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a resolution of the Senate, adopted on the 8th instant, requesting you to communicate to the Senate, if not incompatible with the public safety, the number of troops each State has furnished to the Confederate Army.

I respectfully submit that the information cannot be furnished without disclosing the strength of our armies to many persons of subordinate position whose secrecy cannot be relieved on. I beg leave to remind you of a report made in response to a similar one from the Federal Congress, communicated to them in secret session, and now a part of our archives. While I have no reason to doubt the fidelity of any of the officers of the senate or of the War Department, yet it may be well apprehended that some of them are not discreet enough to be trusted with information which cannot be divulged with a due regard for the public safety.

With every possible desire to communicate the fullest information to Congress in reference to the strength, condition, and operations of the Army, I feel it my duty in the present instance to suspend action on the resolution of the Senate until their wishes are known and your instructions are received.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.

RICHMOND, VA., September 11, 1862.

The SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:

The circumstances necessarily surrounding an army operating in presence of an enemy render it inexpedient-next to impossible-to assemble frequent courts-martial, and to detail for them the best