War of the Rebellion: Serial 128 Page 0017 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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Your commandants of camps for conscripts are calling them out and will soon get in service all liable to that duty.

J. J. PETTUS.

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Raleigh, July 26, 1862.

Hon. GEORGE W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: The numerous appeals made to me for my influence to exempt certain very hard cases under the conscript act induces me to call your attention to three classes who seem to have pressing claims for your consideration:

First. Tanners-There are many small establishment of this sort which contribute essentially to the supply of a most necessary article, whose services cannot well be stopped. They supply neighborhoods, while large tanneries supply the public.

Second. There is a class of millers who are directly and immediately necessary for a supply of food, and too poor to employ a substitute like their brethren on a larger scale, who are exempted without a substitute.

Third. Physicians themselves are not entitled to more than other professions or trades, yet it so happens from the number in the Army, either soldiers or surgeons, many large districts of country are likely to be without physicians if the conscript act is rigidly enforced. Doctors are an admitted necessity. All of them should not be excused, but a regulation which would leave one to each district would be most favorably esteemed. The law gives you no power or discretion about discharges or exemptions; but they may be enrolled, with permission to remain at home "waiting orders. " If these cases have any merit they will at once occur to you, and I leave them for your consideration.

Yours, most respectfully,

HENRY T. CLARK.

[Indorsement.]

The Secretary of War has considered all these cases and many more.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, July 26, 1862.

Hon. G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I herewith inclose you a copy of a representation made to this Department, stating that General H. E. McCulloch, of Texas, seized the war tax collected in that State. This interference is likely to produce the greatest confusion, both in this Department and in the War Department. I had appointed a depositary in Texas, to whom I had directed the war tax to be paid, and have drawn Treasury warrants on him to pay requisitions made by the War Department. These warrants will now be dishonored. The Treasury Department will have no means of administering the war-tax arrangements, as it seems that the general will intercept the money before it reaches the chief collector or depositary. It appears to me that the transaction is so illegal and so irregular as to call for the immediate interference of the Government.

2 R R-SERIES IV, VOL II