War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 1094 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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RICHMOND, FREDERICKSBURG AND POTOMAC R. R. Co.,

PRESIDENT'S OFFICE,

Richmond, April 26, 1862.

Hon. GEORGE W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: At the risk of seeming tedious, permit me to say that my impression that you were mistaken last night in your recollection of the extent to which Louis Napoleon used railroads in transporting his army into Sardinia is this morning confirmed by a gentleman who is a most experienced and well-informed railroad officer, and is also the most devoted student of geography and military history, with the most accurate and extraordinary memory for every detail, however minute, of battles and all other military operations, that I have ever met with. He is positive in his recollection that not less than 100,000, and probably more, of that army were gradually concentrated at Toulon and sent thence by sea to Genoa, and the rest were during some six weeks being concentrated at a little town (the name of which I now forget) on the confines of France and Italy, whence they were transferred, partly on foot and partly on a double-track railroad, into Sardinia. The capacity of a double-track railroad, adequately equipped like the European railways, may be moderately computed at five times that of a single-track road like those of the Confederate States. For the sudden and rapid movement of a vanguard of an army, to hold in check an enemy till re-enforced, or of a rear guard to cover a retreat, or of any other portion of an army which must move suddenly and rapidly, and for the transportation of ordnance, ammunition, commissary and other military supplies, railroads are available and invaluable to an army. And when these objects of prime necessity are attained they can advantageously carry more troops according to the amount of the other transportation required, the distance, their force and equipment, &c. But to rely on them as a means of transporting any large body of troops, besides what is needed to supply and maintain them, is certainly a most dangerous delusion and must inevitably result in the most grievous disappointment and fatal consequences.

Very respectfully and truly, yours, &c.,

P. V. DANIEL, Jr.,

President.

P. S. -As a railroad officer, interest would prompt me to advocate the opposite theory about this matter, for troops constitute the most profitable, if not the only profitable, part of army transportation by railroads. But I cannot be less and patriot because I am a railroad officer.

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, No. 30.

Richmond, April 23, 1862.

I. The following acts, having passed both Houses of Congress, were dully approved by the President, and are now published for the information of the Army:

An ACT to organize bands of partisan rangers.

SECTION 1. The Congress of the Confederate States of America do enact, That the President be, and is hereby, authorized to commission such officers as he