War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 1039 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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Pounds.

Amount of beef packed at Thoroughfare (net). . . . . . 1,195,914

Amount sent to Captains McKinnie and Vaughan. . . . . 1,037,260

Amount sent to Warrenton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15,000

Amount consumed by hands and guard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,092

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1,057,352

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Balance of beef at Thoroughfare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138,562

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Total amount of meat left at Thoroughfare. . . . . . . . . . . 369,819

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Of this amount there was given to the people of the

neighborhood, and to the paries engaged in hauling

meat to Warrenton, about. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200,000

There was burned about, say. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169,819

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Total amount destroyed and given away. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369,819

There were also burned about 500 hides and a large amount of tallow which had been sold and delivered to George S. Hoods; also two large slaughter-houses and seven house cars. The packing and smoke houses were so near to private property that they could not be burned without destroying it, and they were therefore ordered to be torn down and carried off. All the neat's-foot oil, about 300 gallons, was sent too Warrenton. As for the reasons for the loss exhibited by the foregoing statement, I consider it sufficient to state the facts connected therewith, and to express the opinion that it was not the result of remissness of any o ne connected with your department. I received from you notice of the proposed evacuation of Manassas on the 21st of February, two weeks before it occurred, and could I have obtained the transportation by railroad which was promised all the property at Thoroughfare could have been removed during the first week; or had I been told that such transportation could not be had I could have removed it all by wagons to Warrenton within the time, but I was not aware of that fact until the day before the evacuation occurred. I came to thoroughfare on the 22d. Orders were given to stop the slaughtering of cattle and hogs and arrangements made for sending the meat to Mount Jackson and Orange Court-House. Mr. Stuart went on the 24th to Mount Jackson, appointed an agent, and had a house erected to receive the meat. Mr. Hunton was sent to Orange Court-House to get buildings and to secure the meat as sent. By the 26th Mr. Stuart had made arrangements with the superintendents of the railroads for the transportation of at least 200,000 pounds per day. The meat was taken from the houses and placed on platforms for convenience of lading the cars. The force of hands was increased, and every possible arrangements on our part was made for sending off the property. The cars promised by the superintendents were not furnished because, as I was informed, the Government had taken control of the transportation.

On the 28th ultimo, at the instance of Major Cole, we had an interview with Major Barbour, chief quartermaster, who promptly gave an order for such transportation as I needed; but although every effort was made both by Major Cole and myself, as well as by Mr. Stuart (who proved himself in this, as he has in all other matters of business, a most efficient and industrious agent), but forty-five cars could be had, which were promptly loaded and sent off. Up to t he 8th instant continual calls were ineffectually made for cars. They were continually promised and expected. The meat was all taken from the houses and placed on scaffolds ready for loading, and remained in that exposed condition for six days. During this time only seven