War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0972 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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Third. It is impossible to state what arms "are in possession of the armies in the field and not in the hands of the soldiers. " The number varies every morning in every regiment, according to the discharges, furloughs, returns, and enlistments of men during the day.

At this moment especially would it be impracticable even to approximate the number, while men are leaving in large numbers on re-enlistment or furloughs, and others are returning in charge of the recruiting officers, scattered all over the country under the recent recruiting laws.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, Va., March 6, 1862.

Hon. JAMES H. CARSON,

Chairman of the Senate, Virginia:

SIR: I have the honor to respond to the resolution of your committee as follows:

1. That the Confederate Government will gratefully accept the aid of any troops that the State of Virginia will raise on her own account.

2. The relation of any troops so raised would be as follows, viz: They would act independently under the orders of the State in such manner as the State authorities might direct; but if they happened to do duty together with Confederate troops their mutual relations would be governed by the Sixty-second Article of War, as established in the twenty-ninth section of the act of March 6, 1861, No. 52, entitled "An act for the establishment and organization of the Army of the Confederate States of America. "

I believe all the questions submitted in your resolution are substantially answered above, but if mistaken I will cheerfully and promptly give to the committee any further information in my power.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, Va., March 6, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM PORCHER MILES,

Chairman of Committee on Military Affairs, Congress:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose to you a copy of a letter* just received from the Adjutant-General, to which I respectfully request that you will ask the early attention of the military committee. It is unnecessary, however, further to remark that the act of May 10, 1861, above referred to, has been practically abrogated (in regard to companies in service) by the clause in the act No. 356, in regard to recruiting companies in service for the war, and a similar clause in the act No. 370, in regard to recruiting companies in service for twelve months, by which it is provided that no company shall contain more than 125 men, rank and file. This limitation, however excellent in other arms of the service, is inconvenient when applied to artillery, whether light or heavy. Companies of larger size are

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*See Cooper to Benjamin, March 3, p. 964.

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