War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0918 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

supplies, and funds for paying bounty. Let me know where you fix your camps.

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War.

A PROCLAMATION.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Milledgeville, February 11, 1862.

To the PEOPLE OF GEORGIA:

The outrageous usurpations of power and aggressions upon our rights committed by the Federal Government, and the absolute degradation to which the Southern people were exposed if they submitted to the rule of Mr. Lincoln, who was elevated to power by the abolitionists and protectionists of the North, compelled the State of Georgia, in common with her other Southern sisters, to withdraw from a Union in which the constitutional rights of her people were no longer respected and their lives and property no longer secure. After the secession of the Southern States and the establishment of the Confederate States Government the tyrannical despotism which rules at Washington waged a wicked and bloody war upon the people of these States, because in the exercise of one of the most sacred rights of freemen we threw off the yoke of bondage attempted to be fastened upon us and our posterity and refused to be "hewers of wood and drawers of water" for a haughty and insolent people who claimed the right to compel us to render obedience to their mandates. In their attempt to subjugate us the Northern troops have been permitted to disregard all the rules of civilized warfare. They have not only stolen out property and laid waste the country behind them where they have advanced within our territory, but with fiendish malignity they have on several occasions, in cold blood, shot down unarmed and unoffending women and children. Not only have they disregarded all the dictates of humanity, but with sacrilegious infidelity they have even desecrated the altars of God, and have defiled and polluted our churches and places of public worship.

While the troops in the field have been perpetrating these enormous wrongs, the Lincoln Cabintion of the plainest principles of the Constitution, suspended the writ of habeas corpus, and has ordered the seizure and imprisonment of Southern men and Southern women, and of such as sympathize with us, for an indefinite period, without the verdicts of juries, the judgments of courts, or the sentence of courts-martial. Some of the noblest and truest sons and daughters of Georgia are included in the number whose rights have been thus wantonly outraged. But these outrages are not confined to the troops and to the Cabinet. The Lincoln Congress has passed laws confiscating a very large portion of the property of the Southern people, and a bill is now pending before that body, if it has not already passed, to assess an exceedingly burdensome tax against the lands of every man in the South to assist them to carry on the war for our destruction; and if the tax is not paid into their treasury after a short period, the bill declares that all our lands shall be confiscated and taken from us, and authorizes the President, as fast as he gains possession of the country be force of arms, to seize the lands, eject their Southern owners from them, and colonize them with Yankees and foreigners, who are to hold them under the authority of the United