War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0799 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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A RESOLUTION appointing John D. Morris, of Kentucky, a receiver under the act of sequestration, approved August 30, 1861.

The Congress of the Confederate States of America do resolve, That John D. Morris, appointed by the government of Kentucky as their special commissioner to secure to co-operation of the Confederate States in the sequestration of the property, effects, and credits of certain banking corporations of the said State, be hereby clothed with the powers of a receiver, under the act for the sequestration of the property of alien enemies, approved thirtieth of August, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, throughout the Confederate States, and as such, he alone be authorized to ascertain, seize, and sequestrate the property, effects, and credits of all the banking corporations of the said State that may have made loans, or extended pecuniary aid to the United States, or the government of Kentucky, waging war against the Confederate States; and when so sequestrated, instead of paying the same into the Treasury of the Confederate States, shall account for and pay over the same, under his commission, to the government of Kentucky.

Approved December 16, 1861.

NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE, December 16, 1861.

(Via Wilmington 20th.)

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War, Richmond:

We were compelled to enter here in distress in a sinking condition, utterly unable to accomplish the object of the voyage. Have put such repairs on the Theodore as will enable her, I hope, to reach port safely. She cannot carry cargo in her present state. The British steamer Gladiator is here with a very valuable cargo, but cannot get out owing to presence of a Yankee gun-boat. I have written fully. I leave by the Karnak in an hour from this for Havana to consult with Helm.

L. HEYLIGER.

NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE, December 16, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War, Richmond:

DEAR SIR: I leave by the Karnak in an hour from this, and shall return by her on the 21st, unless otherwise directed by Mr. Helm. The Yankee gun-boat is still in port and seems determined not to budge so long as the Gladiator remains. The Federal Government has endeavored to obtain leave to establish a coal station here, but thus far the permission has been refused, and through the influence of our friends will not, I believe, be acceded to. I do not think that the gun-boat has more than twenty-four hours' fuel on board. I shall aid Mr. Helm, to the best of my ability, in promoting the success of the Gladiator. If I had the requisite authority she would have been in a Confederate port before this. I was anxious to see her leave the day of my arrival and suggested the step, but not being able to follow it up by advice of a decisive character, the captain preferred to halt.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. HEYLIGER.