War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0776 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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[DECEMBER 2, 1861. -For Benjamin to Bragg, in relation to the re-enlistment of troops for the war, see Series I, VOL. VI, p. 773.]

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA,

ORDNANCE OFFICE, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, Va., December 4, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War:

SIR: Referring to act No. 232 of the third session of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States, "making appropriation for the public defense," approved August 21, 1861, I have the honor to report that the amount apportioned to the Ordnance Department, in accordance with the provision in the second section of said act, is now entirely exhausted. I estimate that about $1,750,000 will be required for the necessary expenses of the department during the current month of December.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. GORGAS,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Ordnance.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, No. 254.

Richmond, December 4, 1861.

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XV. Hereafter the bodies of deceased soldiers will not be transported home except on the application of father, mother, son, or wife.

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By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Resolution of confidence in our cause of war, and in the President and in the Army.

Resolved, That we, the delegates of the people of North Carolina in convention assembled, entertain an undiminished confidence in the justice of the cause in which we have taken up arms, and we hold it to be the duty of the people of the Southern States to maintain and uphold that cause with all the means they can command.

Resolved, that in behalf of the people of North Carolina we declare to our sister States of this Confederacy and to the world that no measure of loss, no sacrifice of life or property, no privation or want shall cause us to shrink from the performance of our whole duty in the achievement of our independence.

Resolved, That from cruel and barbarous manner in which our enemies have carried on this war-a war in which aged and dignified men and helpless women have been seized and without accusation or warrant or authority cast into prison; in which private property has been wantonly destroyed; in which robbery and arson are principal means of aggression, and in which servile insurrection has been proclaimed, we are convinced that there is a "radical incompatibility" between such people and ourselves; and from them our separation is