War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0769 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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matter under what flag nor to what destination. These stores are in a majority of instances applied to the fitting out of hostile expeditions against us. They are sent either directly or circuitously to our enemies, and aid them against us. You are instructed not to allow such shipments to be made.

Your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Acting Secretary of War.

B.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, October 21, 1861.

Brigadier Gen. Jos. R. ANDERSON,

Wilmington, N. C.:

SIR: I wrote you a short time ago that no vessels were to be permitted to leave the ports of North Carolina laden with naval stores whilst those ports were blockaded. This order was dictated by the plainest necessity of self-defense. We could not permit the enemy's fleet to seize those supplies which the enemy most required in prosecuting the war.

It seems, however, that the two vessels to which you referred were laden under the faith of a permit from the Secretary of the Treasury, on assurances deemed by him reliable, that they would go across the Atlantic. Under these circumstances the Government, of course, feels bound not to disappoint the just expectations of the neutral owners, whilst it feels compelled to spare no effort to prevent the enemy taking advantage of the shipment of these stores.

You are therefore instructed to permit these two vessels to depart with their cargoes whenever you shall feel satisfied that they can leave the port without risk of capture by the blockading fleet.

I am, your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Acting Secretary of War.

P. S. -The owners have been informed that if they are not willing to wait till they can depart with safety, the Government will purchase their cargoes, with a fair allowance for indemnity for loss of voyage.

C.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, November 15, 1861.

General Jos. R. ANDERSON,

Wilmington, N. C.:

SIR: In my former letter on the subject of the two vessels laden with naval stores I informed you that you were at liberty to permit their departure whenever they could leave without risk of capture by the blockading fleet.

The owners complain that by this language you understand that the vessels are not to depart till the blockade is raised. Such was not my meaning. The idea was that on the many occasions which occur, by tempestuous weather or other causes, when the vessels employed on the blockade temporarily disappear, you were at liberty to use your discretion to permit the departure of the neutral vessels. Perhaps the best test is this: Suppose yourself to be the owner of the neutral

49 R R-SERIES IV, VOL I