War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0754 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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This order has met with success. Officers proceeded with activity to the organization, both in the city and country. Companies daily present themselves for commissions for their officers. It only remains to arrange them in battalions and regiments, which will be done in a very short time. I herewith annex the returns of the militia of the State so far as received. Only a few of the officers have complied with that portion of the order. I hope soon, however, to be able to report to the Legislature a full statement of the militia force. In the First Division the returns show a force of (see Document D*) 30,499; Confederate Guards (see Document F*), 752; making a total of that division of 31, 251.

The following parishes have made their returns, to wit:

Parish of Iberville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 634

Parish of Natchitoches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,031

Parish of Livingston. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 754

Parish of Saint Tammany. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442

Parish of Saint Charles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210

Parish of Washington. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 441

Parish of Carroll. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 691

Parish of East Baton Rouge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,200

Parish of East Feliciana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495

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5,898

The militia law should be revised and amended. One more stringent should be adopted. Officers should have full powers to compel obedience to orders and attendance to drills, musters, and reviews. Heavy fines should be imposed in times of peace on delinquents, and if the fine be not paid, then imprisonment for a certain term. These apparently harsh measures would seldom be resorted to, for persons subject to militia duty would obey and conform to the laws if the are made to understand that the law is to be no longer a farce. In times of war, when troops for State service are mustered in, or whenever any portion of the militia is called out by the Governor for the performance of any active duty, they should be subjected to the strict and rigid rules and regulations of war. It is only by strict discipline that any good results can be obtained from troops. Where every man in a company believes he is at liberty to do as he pleases, and there is no law to reach him, he will not be a good soldier, and he deters others from the path of duty. Volunteer corps should be encouraged. They should be formed into battalions or regiments, belonging to some brigade, and not claim to be totally independent of superior officers. No higher privileges should be granted or allowed to one corps over another. The adjutant-general should have authority to administer oaths. This would obviate considerable difficulties to officers applying for commissions. The State arsenal is in need of the necessary tools, &c. I would recommend an appropriation of $300. An appropriation of $2,000 should be made to meet the contingent expenses of the office of the adjutant-general. This office requires a large quantity of books and stationery, and the adjutant-general is compelled to furnish blank reports and returns for the militia throughout the State. Some persons were charged with the taking of the census of the militia in the regimental beats, and have presented a claim for their services. It is for the Legislature to say whether a remuneration should or should not be granted them. The various newspapers of the city and country have for years published all orders emanating from the various corps,

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*Omitted.

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