War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0748 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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discharged, I, Thomas O. Moore, Governor of the State of Louisiana, do hereby proclaim that volunteers will be received in accordance with the requisition of the President of the Confederate States, each company to be composed of not less than sixty-four privates, four sergeants, four corporals, one captain, one first and one second lieutenant. Captains of companies volunteering for the service will address Adjt. Gen. M. Grivot, at New Orleans, La., and hold themselves in readiness at a moment's notice, subject to the orders of the Governor.

By order of Thomas O. Moore, Governor and commander-in-chief:

M. GRIVOT,

Adjutant and Inspector General of Louisiana.

As soon as this proclamation made its appearance in all parts of the State companies were organizing and tendering their services; in less than five days the number of troops offering exceeded 5,000. This requisition did not state whether they were to be received by companies, battalions, or regiments. A subsequent requisition for 5,000 additional troops, received on the 21st of April, 1861, gave the authority to organize them into battalions and regiments. Under this requisition the following proclamation was issued:

PROCLAMATION BY THE GOVERNOR.

HEADQUARTERS LOUISIANA MILITIA, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

New Orleans, April 21, 1861.

The President of the Confederate States having made a requisition upon the Governor of Louisiana for 5,000 infantry to serve for twelve months unless sooner discharged (this force being in addition to the 3,000 already called for.) I, Thomas O. Moore, Governor of the State of Louisiana, do hereby proclamation that volunteers will be received in accordance with the requisition of the president of the Confederate States, each company to be composed of not less than sixty-four privates, four sergeants, four corporals, one captain, one first and two second lieutenants. Volunteers will be received by companies, battalions, or regiments. Those offering will address Adjt. Gen. M. Grivot, at New Orleans, La., stating the force of their command, will remain in the parish in which they form, perfect themselves in the drill, &c., and hold themselves in readiness at a moment's notice, subject to the orders of the Governor. The Governor appeals to the patriotic citizens of this State to respond to his proclamation for the protection of the rights of the South.

By order of Thomas O. Moore, Governor and commander-in-chief:

M. GRIVOT,

Adjutant and Inspector General of Louisiana.

On the 23d of April the following order war issued:

ORDER HDQRS. LOUISIANA MILITIA, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, No. 105.

New Orleans, April 23, 1861.

Four regiments of infantry will be received and mustered into the service of the Confederate Army under the requisitions by companies as soon as presented. Companies or battalions will rendezvous at the city of New Orleans without delay and report to the adjutant-general.

By order of Thomas O. Moore, Governor and commander-in-chief:

M. GRIVOT,

Adjutant and Inspector General of Louisiana.

The troops were arriving rapidly. It was found expedient to establish a camp in the neighborhood of the city, and by Order no, 188, issued on the 29th of April, 1861, Captain Walker was established on the Metairie Course under the command of Brigadier Gen. E. L. Tracy, First Division, Louisiana Militia, detailed for that purpose. The number of troops increasing, the fear of disease in camps, and owing to the scarcity of water, it was deemed advisable to transfer the camp to Tangipahoa, on the Jackson railroad. This camp was called Camp Moore. The First Regiment Louisiana Volunteers was organized on the 25th of April by the election of Albert G. Blanchard as colonel,