War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0540 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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As regards France, offers of arms had been made in that country, and although we had every reason to believe that it was hopeless to look for serviceable arms there, we would have laid ourselves open to censure had we failed to make an effort there. Accordingly, having completed our arrangements in England, we visited Paris together. Immediately on our arrival we called on parties said to have the control of qualities of arms. They reported to us that they could furnish furnished to the French army-in fact, that they would be taken direct from the French arsenals. Believing that if the Government had may arms to dispose of we could obtain them without the assistance of middlemen, who in such cases make enormous profits, application was made to Judge Rost, commissioner of the Confederate States, to obtain information direct from official sources within his reach. A copy of a letter from Judge Rost is herewith inclosed,* from which it will be seen that there are no arms to be furnished in France. While in Paris intelligence was received by telegraph from Messrs. Fraser, Trenholm & Co. that money had arrived from home and that our presence was required in Liverpool. It was not thought advisable for both of us to leave Paris immediately, since it was at that time by no means certain that we would not be able to procure arms from the French arsenals. Accordingly Major Anderson repaired to Liverpool, leaving Captain Huse in Paris to prosecute inquiries. We found Judge Rost ready and anxious in every way to assist us. He obtained permission for us to visit Vincennes Arsenal and the several fortifications about Paris. Captain Huse only was enabled to avail himself of the permit, and he visited Vincennes only, having been recalled to England by a dispatch from Major Anderson to repair immediately to Liverpool. We four in Liverpool that there would be an opportunity to ship material to the Confederacy within few days, and though the time to elapse before the sailing of the ship was very short, we determined to make the best use of a portion of the money just received in the prosecution of the orders of the Department. The accompanying invoices will show the amount and character of the muskets and munitions shipped. * It will be observed that incomplete sets of equipments are forwarded. This we have done, knowing that the deficiencies could be supplied at home if the urgency of the case required. The parts necessary to complete every set will be forwarded by the next shipment, which we hoped will be eks. Leather in large quantities for harness has been forwarded. It is generally of a character adapted to artillery harness. Buckles, thread, awls, knives, &c., for manufacturing are also included in the shipment. Bits to a very limited extent only we were enabled to obtain at so short a notice. There are also a few sets of artillery harness (ten double). Twelve pieces of light 12-pounder field artillery, rifled, of the Blakely manufacture, same as the gun which gave such general satisfaction at Sumter, constitute a portion of the shipment. A considerable quantity of solid shot and segmented shells accompany. A considerable quantity of solid shot and segmented shells accompany. The vessel by which we are shipping will not take gunpowder in barrels. We are therefore forced to reserve fifty barrels of cannon and twenty barrels of rifle powder for the next opportunity. We had no orders for cartridge paper, but feel confident that the purchase of enough for the manufacture of 200,000 cartridges will not be disapproved. One saddle, shipped with the leather, is the latest pattern adopted for the British cavalry. With the knapsacks is one complete British

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*Not found.

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