War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0473 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, July 12, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN LETCHER,

Governor of Virginia:

SIR: I take the liberty of laying before Your Excellency a letter from Major Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance Bureau of the Confederate States, with the indorsement thereon of C. Dimmock, colonel of ordnance of the State of Virginia, and in so doing I beg leave to inquire whether or not the government of Virginia designs to keep up a separate and distinct ordnance department. It is important that the subject should be understood. The precise point to which I would now call the attention of Your Excellency is whether the lead taken from Harper's Ferry on Tuesday last is to be subject to the orders of this Department, or only to the orders of the Virginia authorities. In deciding this point I beg Your Excellency will recollect that the lead aforesaid has been removed since the transfer to the Confederate States of the machinery, & c., which had been seized at Harper's Ferry. For an early answer to these inquiries I would ber Excellency.

Very respectfully,

L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA,

ORDNANCE OFFICE, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, Va., July 11, 1861.

Mr. S. ADAMS,

Master Armorer:

By direction of the Secretary of War of the Confederate States you will, on the receipt of this order, deliver to Mr. W. S. Downer, for transportation to the laboratory of the Confederate States, the lead received from Harper's Ferry on Tuesday.

J. GORGAS,

Major and Chief of Ordnance.

[Indorsement.]

Having no order from the Governor of Virginia by which I should be authorized to consent to the within order, Mr. Adams will wait further orders. The lead is not any part of the machinery, but material.

C. DIMMOCK,

Colonel of Ordnance, Virginia.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Richmond, July 13, 1861.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN,

Atlanta, Ga.:

DEAR SIR: My attention has been called to a paragraph cut from one of the Georgia papers and inclosed to me by one of the Richmond editors. The paragraph referred to has some animadversions on an article which appeared in a Richmond paper on the subject of the arms of Georgia, and for which it would seem the Secretary of