War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0305 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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This movement has the cordial approval and sanction of Governor Pickens, which will be seen from the following letter, which we publish at the request of Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson:

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT, Montgomery, April 27, 1861.

SIR: I have said to Colonel Wade Hampton that I would accept the regiment with legionary formation which he proposes to raise according to the schedule which he has, if it would be agreeable to Your Excellency. If so, I will make the requisition.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Charleston, April 30, 1861.

The Secretary of War for the Confederate Government, at Montgomery, under date of April 27, having agreed to accept a regiment of legionary formation, under Colonel Wade Hampton, if it would be agreeable to me, I hereby state that it will not only be agreeable to me but I will take great pride in it, as one could with more propriety be selected as commander of such a force than Colonel Hampton. I will contribute everything in my power to aid in its formation by furnishing such arms as may be at my disposal, and also in allowing any privileges consistent with the public service. The memorandum or tabular statement as to the nature of the service, which is hereunto attached, has my unqualified approbation; and when the regiment is formed I will be rejoiced to meet any requisition the Secretary of War my make. This force is expressly intended as a branch of the Provisional Army under the Confederate Government, and the commissions of the officers will be form the President of the Confederate Government. It is understood that the cavalry are to furnish their own horses and equipments, and, as far as possible, their arms. It is intended to be an independent corps, ready for service anywhere.

F. W. PICKENS.

LYNCHBURG, VA., May 8, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER,

Montgomery, Ala.:

MY DEAR GENERAL: The Reverend Mr. Chadick, a member of Captain Tracy's company, now encamped here, requests me to mention his name favorably to you for the chaplaincy of the Fourth Regiment of Alabama Volunteers. He is undn provision for such appointments has been made by a late act of Congress. I recommend him willingly because he is actuated in coming hither by patriotic feeling and for the further reason that his appointment, it is believed, is desired by a large number of the regiment. I am working very hard mustering in troops as fast as possible after their arrival. I find some of them very deficient in arms and accouterments and in tents. They are raw, wild, undisciplined Democrats, on a frolic, as many of them think, and commanded in many instances by inefficient and inexperienced officers. I must do our Third Alabama Regiment the justice to except them from such a charge. I this composed of the very best material, and there are eight out of the ten companies well disciplined and well officered. I understand there is great dissatisfaction in Virginia because of the military condition of the State. No one seems to have control, and consequently there are conflicting commands. I t is thought Lee is too slow and fearful of responsibility, and I know from the orders sent from Richmond to State officers here that there is required some man who will bring order out of confusion. I wrote you a line a few days since which I trust has been received. Will you bear in mind the request then