War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0271 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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appointed to act in conjunction with me, I shall be happy to devote myself to the accomplishment of the proposed object. Inclosed I hand you a letter of introduction to President Davis given me by Governor Moore, of Louisiana.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. AYMAR.

[Inclosure.]

NEW ORLEANS, April 25, 1861.

JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States, Montgomery, Ala.:

DEAR SIR: I beg leave to introduce to you Mr. W. H. Aymar, a gentleman of standing and respectability in New Orleans. Mr. Aymar is a British subject, who desires to have an interview with you on the subject of the purchase of arms and ammunition in Canada for the use of the Confederate States. You can rely upon all that Mr. Aymar says to you.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THO. O. MOORE.

MARIETTA, April 30, 1861.

L. P. WALKER:

I have sent most of my best drilled companies to Virginia. Will do the best I can for you. Do not believe it possible to have them ready with tents, knapsacks, and accouterments immediately. Can you furnish any? The calls come so fast one cannot get enough made.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Montgomery, April 30, 1861.

His Excellency FRANCIS W. PICKENS,

Governor of South Carolina:

SIR: I have had the honor to receive your letters of the 23d and 25th of April, and should have instantly replied to them but for the overwhelming pressure upon me consequent on the approach of Congress. It gives me now very great pleasure to reassure Your Excellency that the amount of subsistence applied for will be furnished, and to add my cordial approval of the steps taken in reference to the forces you have raised under the requisition of General Beauregard. When these troops shall be called for by his Department they will be placed under Confederate officers, and be assigned to active and not garrison duty, according to your wishes. Our plan of operations for the campaign is not yet thoroughly matured, but troops will rendezvous Virginia, subject to orders. Virginia and North Carolina are considered certain to unite with this Government, and in our intercourse with them, especially in military operations, they are thus regarded. The uniform, earnest, and consistent co-operation of Your Excellency with efforts here to defend and maintain the general interest is deeply felt and acknowledged by each member of the Government, but by none more sincerely than myself.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration,

L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War.