War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0235 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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APRIL 23, 1861.

L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

I am exerting myself to have the regiments, as wanted by your dispatches of yesterday, in readiness as early as practicable; but as our State cannot keep men in camp to move at any moment, for want of means, and the Confederate Government will not take charge of them until wanted for immediate us, they are obliged to remain at home, and ordered here by me whenever you call for them. Of course, then, it requires time, but rest assured all I can do will be done. If I could receive them at any time and at once muster them into the service of the Confederate States, I believe I could soon fill both requisitions early. Will your order your commanding officer here to receive and muster into service companies, battalions, or regiments as fast as organized? Otherwise it must always require time to bring them here.

Yours, respectfully,

THO. O. MOORE.

MONTGOMERY, April 23, 1861.

Governor THOMAS O. MOORE,

New Orleans:

Will you let me have two regiments or one?

L. P. WALKER.

JACKSON, April 23, 1861.

L. P. WALKER:

Requisition for two regiments received. Will be promptly responded to. Will telegraph you place of rendezvous to-morrow.

JOHN J. PETTUS.

RALEIGH, April 23, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Our Legislature will meet soon, and will furnish the regiment as soon as [I] get authority. Am concentrating troops here as fast as possible.

JNO. W. ELLIS,

Governor.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

April 23, 1861.

I am willing, if a full roll of the above companies shall be made out, to give the proper order for them to march to Virginia and Maryland for defense; but still they are volunteers from South Carolina, and not technically in the Provisional Army of the Confederate States, but volunteers from South Carolina, to be placed under a Confederate general for twelve months, if necessity requires, but not to be ordered back to garrison any fort or to march to other States permanently without the consent of the Government of South Carolina.