War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0216 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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MONTGOMERY, April 10, 1861.

JOSEPH E. BROWN,

Milledgeville:

No requisition has been made except through yourself in the first instance. The call for Hill's company was made for the reason previously stated. You may feel satisfied that I shall regard all the courtesies.

L. P. WALKER.

NEW HAVEN, CONN., April 10, 1861.

Hon. JEFFERSON DAVIS:

MY DEAR SIR: I am a native of Tennessee, the stepson of the Hon. John Bell, of that State; the brother-in-law of Captain John Pope, of the topographical engineers, the relative of Mrs. Mary McRee, in whose husband's company you served as lieutenant. I enter into this personal detail that I may, in some degree, prove to you that my connections are respectable, and that my statements and propositions may be received with some confidence. From present indications war seems to be resolved upon. If this dead contingency should arise, I can, without the slightest difficulty, raise and equip from this city two companies of 100 men each to serve under your command, every man a Democrat, upon whom you can rely. I have an independent fortune, and do not ask pecuniary assistance from any quarter. I only ask from you that you will receive these companies and grant for the war commissions to such officers as they may elect. I am a lawyer by profession, a graduate of Yale College, served in the Mexican war, was present at the siege of Vera Cruz and the battle of Cerro Gordo, and on account of my health have resided in this city for the past six years. Mr. Toombs is acquainted with my family, and will, I doubt not, assure you of its respectability; but I believe you know my mother, Mrs. John Bell, whom you have met in Washington.

With my most ardent wishes for your personal welfare, and for your successful administration amid the difficulties and embarrassments which encompass you,

I remain, with great personal esteem, most respectfully, your friend,

THOMAS YEATMAN.

MONTGOMERY, April 10, 1861.

JOHN FORSYTH,

Washington, D. C.:

Will take, to be delivered at once, ninety tons cannon and ten tons musket powder. Let there be no mistake as to its quality, and let me know terms, &c. Will not take rifles.

L. P. WALKER.

WASHINGTON, April 10, 1861.

L. P. WALKER,

Secretary of War:

I have ordered 200 tons best Hazard's cannon-powder at price paid by United States Government, to be delivered in same manner as the pistols.

JNO. FORSYTH.