War of the Rebellion: Serial 127 Page 0101 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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The vote being taken by States for President, the Hon. Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, received all the votes cast, being 6, and was duly declared unanimously elected President of the Provisional Government.

On motion of Mr. Toombs, a committee of three was appointed to inform Mr. Davis of his election.

Whereupon the president appointed Mr. Toombs, Mr. Rhett, and Mr. Morton.

The vote was then taken by States for Vive-President, and the Hon. Alexander Hamilton Stephens, of Georgia, received all the votes cast, being 6, and he was duly declared unanimously elected Vive-President of the Provisional Government.

Mr. Perkins moved that a committee of three be appointed to inform Mr. Stephens of his election; which was agreed to.

And the president appointed Mr. Perkins, Mr. Harris, and Mr. Shorter.

Congress then adjourned till Monday next at 11 o'clock.

AN ACT to continue in force certain law of the United States of America.

Be it enacted by the Confederate States of America in Congress assembled, That all the laws of the United States of America in force and in use in the Confederate States of America on the 1st day of November last, and not inconsistent with the Constitution of the Confederate States, be, and the same are hereby, continued in force until altered or repealed by the Congress.

Adopted February 9, 1861.

MONTGOMERY, ALA., February 9, 1861.

Hon. JEFFERSON DAVIS,

Jackson:

SIR: We are directed to inform you that you were this day unanimously elected President of the Provisional Government of the Confederate States of America, and to request you to come to Montgomery immediately. We send also a special messenger. Do not wait for him.

R. TOOMBS.

R. BARNWELL RHETT.

JACKSON MORTON.

MONTGOMERY, ALA., February 9, 1861.

Hon. ALEXANDER H. STEPHENS:

SIR: The Congress for the Provisional Government for the Confederate States of America have this day unanimously elected you to the office of Vice-President of the Confederate States, and we have been appointed to communicate the fact, and to respectfully invite your acceptance. In performing this pleasing duty, allow us to express the hope that you will accept, and we beg to suggest that it would be most agreeable to the body we represent, as you are a member of the Congress, that you should signify to it in person your con-