War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0966 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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track torn up, and ties burned, and rails bent in the usual manner. But in addition the enemy had filled up some of the principal cuts with earth, rocks, and brush, hoping thus to prevent the work of reconstruction, or at least retard it os as to interfere with Sherman's plan of pursuit. But their efforts were unsuccessful, for on the 19th the work of reconstruction was completed and we ran into Raleigh on the evening of that day with the constructions train, closely followed by two trains loaded with supplies for the army. During the negotiations for Johnston's surrender we ran trains to Durham's Station, and after the surrender we built Flat Creek bridge, ten miles beyond, thus opening the road to Hillsborough, to which point it was used during the time required to parole Johnston's army. The principal business done over it during this time was carrying subsistence stores to the enemy who had just surrendered.

Track.

The track laid is as follows:

Feet.

Main track..............................................37,960

Side-track at seventh mile post......................... 200

Side-track at Boon Hill................................. 1,500

Main track over bridges................................. 564

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Total...................................................40,224

Or 7 miles 3,264 feet.

Bridges.

The following tabular statement shows the dimensions and the amount of material in the bridges on this line:

Name. Number Height. Length. Amount

of of

spans. lumber.

Feet. Feet. Feet, B.

M.

Little River.. 1 31 150 25,500

Neuse River, Numbers 2 38 314 62,800

2..

Flat Creek... 1 28 100 10,000

Total.. ... ... 564 98,300

Water stations

Were built at Little River and at Smithfield Station. The cost of labor on the North Carolina Railroad up to June 30, 1865, amounted to $162,433.86. The portion of this road west of Raleigh was relinquished to the company immediately after the dispersion of General Johnston's army, but the portion between Goldsborough and Raleigh, forty-eight miles, in length, was held and operated by the Government until October 22, 1865, when it was also turned over to the company.

RALEIGH AND GASTON RAILROAD.

This road extends from raleigh to Gaston, but only twenty-five miles of it, the portion from Raleigh to Cedar Creek, was in our possession and this but for a short time. By General Sherman's order I made an arrangement with Doctor Hawkins, the president of the road, for the use of four locomotives and forty cars for Government service as long as they might be required, and in consideration for this loan we built the Cedar Creek bridge. Johnston's surrender and the arrival of more rolling-stock from the North made it unnecessary for us to call on this company for the fulfillment of their part of the contract.