War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0943 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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The following tabular statement shows the cost of labor on this road for construction and maintenance of way, and the number of men in the Construction Corps employed each month:

Transportation

Construction Corps. Department

Month. Number of Amount of Amount of Total

men pay-rolls pay-rolls

1864.

February 1,222 $83,437,54 ......... $83,437.54

March 919 64,094, 18 ........ 64,094.18

April 1,127 62,224,60 $3,404,86 65,629.46

May 202 4,135,60 6,908,19 11,043.79

June 244 3,995,79 8,537,04 12,532.83

July .... ..... 11,677,03 11,677.03

August ..... ....... 11,321,66 11,321.66

September 724 44,592,24 13,518,25 58,110.49

October ..... ...... 15,228,04 15,228.04

November ..... ..... 12,858,42 12,858.42

December ..... ...... 908,14 908,14

1865.

January ..... ...... 17,680,76 17,680.76

February ...... ...... 20,224,04 20,224.04

March ....... ...... 27,131,03 27,131.03

April ....... ...... 30,229,93 30,229.93

May .... ...... 26,344,91 26,344.91

June ..... ..... 15,776,80 15,776.80

July ....... ...... 13,938,45 13,938.45

August ...... ....... 8,386,95 8,386.95

Total 4,438 262,479,95 244,074,50 506,554.45

Monthly 740 43,746,65 14,357,32 26,660.76

average

Summary of cost.

Quantity Rate Total cost

Materials:

Iron 3,080 $120 per ton $369,600.00

rails..tons.

Chairs..pounds. 152,000 8 cents per 12,160.00

. pound

Spikes.....do.. 228,000 8 1/2 cents per 18,240.00

. pound

Cross-ties 284,061 50 cents per tie 142,030.50

542,030.50

Labor ...... .......... 506,554.45

Contract work .......... .............. 161,990.26

on bridges

Total ........ ............ 1,210,575.21

The Chattanooga and Knoxville Railroad was relinquished as a military road and turned over to the company August 28, 1865.

THE NASHVILLE AND NORTHWESTERN RAILROAD

Is seventy-eight miles long and extends from Nashville to the Tennessee River at Johnsonville. It was partly built before the war. On the 22nd of October, 1863, the Secretary of War ordered this road to be constructed for "military purposes," and placed it in charge of Andrew Johnson, then Military Governor of Tennessee, who was empowered to "employ an engineer and other officers and workmen necessary to complete it without delay." Colonel W. P. Innes was acting as engineer at the time the railroads in this military division were taken charge of by the U. S. Military Railroad Department, and bad a considerable force of soldiers and civilian laborers employed on the road. But as the work was not progressing to the satisfaction of the general commanding, he relieved Colonel Innes and placed the construction of the road in your charge. This order of General Grant's