War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0626 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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The results in detail of this draft are shown in Table 5, Document 6, of Appendix.

The number of names drawn was............................. 292,441

Failed to report.................................. 39,417

Discharged (quota of sub-district being full)..... 447

Discharged per order.............................. 13

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39,877

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Number examined........................................... 252,564

Number exempted........................................... 164,394

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Number found liable to duty............................... 88,170

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Held to personal service................................... 9,880

Furnished substitutes...................................... 26,002

Paid commutation........................................... 52,288

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-- 88,170

The examination of the drafted men was conducted with great faithfulness and fairness, and yet out of 252,564 men examined under this draft, but 9.880 failed to secure exemption from personal service under some one of the special provisions of the law as se forth in sections 2 and 13 of the enrollment act approved March 3, 1863.a

Of all held to service, only 26,002 furnished substitutes; so that after drafting 292,441 men, but 35,882 soldiers were obtained. The proportion of exemptions on account of mental and physical infirmities under this draft was not unduly large. The following facts appear from tables herewith:a

Rates rejected per 1,000 on account of mental and physical infirmities.

United States in 1863..................................... 316.91

France:

From 1831 to 1864......................................... 324.04

In 1859................................................... 317.00

Great Britain:

From 1832 to 1851......................................... 318.59

In 1862................................................... 401.00

Belgium from 1851 to 1855................................. 320.06

In accordance with section 13 of the act, the Secretary of War, on the 30th of June, 1863, announced that the amount to be paid by any person who might be drafted, in order to secure exemption from service, was $300.

Fifty-two thousand two hundred and eighty-eight of those examined under this draft and found liable and fit too perform military duty secured exemption by paying $300 each.

A fund of $15,686,400 thus accrued under this draft, and, being appropriated by section 13 for the procuration of substitutes, it was used as hereinafter explained under the had of "Call of October 17, 1863."

The large proportion of exemptions defeated, in a measure, the object of the law, and a modifications reducing the causes of exemption was urgently demanded by the public exigencies of that period. The necessity for a change having been demonstrated by actual test and practical experience, the more rigid features subsequently introduced as amendments to the law were accepted by the people generally, and added nothing to the difficulties encountered in carrying out the measure.

a See Appendix, Doc. 8.