War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0466 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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Expended during the year........................ $4,940,375.16

Transferred to officers during the year......... 1,117,295.02

Remaining on hand June 30, 1865................ 3,010,639,59

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Total........................................... 9,068,309.77

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The balance on hand is deposited as follows:

At Washington, with Treasurer of United States.. 585,227.08

At New York, with assistant treasurer of

United States................................... 2,199,152.52

At Philadelphia, with First National Bank....... 50,295.92

At Chicago, Ill., with deputy depositary of

United States................................... 6,445.59

At Leavenworth City, with First National Bank... 16,212.50

Treasury notes in vaults........................ 153,305.98

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Balance......................................... 3,010,639.59

Certified that the foregoing statement is correct.

J. A. POTTER,

Colonel and Quartermaster.

Numbers 113. OFFICE ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER, Winchester, Va., August 15, 1865.

Ma. General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: In compliance with General Orders, Numbers 39, Quartermaster-General's Office, dated July 1, 1865, I have the honor to submit the following personal narrative of my services since July 1, 1864 accompanied by statements required therein:

On the 1st of July, 1864, I was on duty at City Point, Va., assisting Captain P. P. Pitkin, assistant quartermaster and depot quartermaster at that point. On the 11th day of July I was assigned to duty as chief quartermaster Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, by command of Lieutenant-General Grant; entered immediately on duty as ordered; shipped the First and Third Divisions, Cavalry Corps, on board transports for Washington, D. C., and was soon after ordered by General Sheridan, commanding, to join him at Harper's Ferry, Va. The order being approved by Lieutenant-General Grant, I immediately proceeded to comply therewith. On my arrival at Harper's Ferry I found General Sheridan's headquarters at Winchester, Va. I proceeded to Winchester and reported to General Sheridan, when I was directed to report in person to General Torbert, chief of cavalry, as chief quartermaster of the cavalry, Middle Military Division; served in that capacity until the death of Colonel Tolles, chief quartermaster Middle Military Division, which position I retained until the division was dissolved. During my service as chief quartermaster of the cavalry the battles of the Opequon, of Winchester, and Fisher's Hill were successfully fought, the cavalry taking aa conspicuous part in all these engagements. No transportation or other public property of importance fell into the hands of the enemy. During my service as chief quartermaster of the Middle Military Division my attention was particularly attracted to the Army of the Shenandoah, numbering from 50,000 to 60,000 men. In consequence of the Winchester and Potomac River Railroad having been entirely destroyed previously, this large number of men, with some 26,000 animals, had to be supplied by teams from Martinsburg, W. Va.

It will be seen that it was no small task to properly arrange the running of these large trains so that the army might not at any time be in need of subsistence, forage, or clothing. The large number of cavalry rendered the supply of forage a difficult task, when it is taken