War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0461 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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the same purpose. My force now increased rapidly, until there was employed at the depot under my control the following number, viz:

Wheelwrights....................................... 119

Carpenters......................................... 78

Laborers........................................... 771

Blacksmiths........................................ 115

Saddlers........................................... 31

Teamsters.......................................... 431

Clerks, superintendents, wagon-masters, &c......... 75

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Total..............................................1,620

The number of animals, &c., varied according to the exigencies of the service, the average number on hand amounting to 2,095 head. The handling and care of this branch of my department required a large force of employes.

Immediately after arriving at City Point I erected shops, such as had always been used in the field, viz, a portable frame covered with canvas (paulins). My force increasing, it was found necessary to enlarge these shops to the following dimensions: Two wheelwright shops, 190 by 25 feet; two blacksmith shops, 190 by 25 feet; two saddler shops, 60 by 22 feet; one carpenter shop, 80 by 22 feet. As a measure of economy I caused these shops to be covered with boards in place of canvas, and stockades built of logs, also covered with boards, as quarters for the employes (winter was approaching) in place of tents.

My carpenters were employed during the year in constructing and repairing wharves, store-houses, stables, stockades at the hospitals for the accommodation of patients, and barracks for the colored employes of the quartermaster's and subsistence departments, consisting of six buildings, each 100 feet long by 25 feet wide and two stories high; also a chapel 25 by 50 feet.

Your attention is respectfully invited to the supplementary statement, marked G, herewith submitted. It will be perceived that the daily issues of animals to officers averaged 181 head, the number of animals daily sod in the blacksmith shops 140, and the number of wagons and ambulances repaired daily 17. As far as possible, where wagons came to my shop for repairs, I caused "brakes" to be put on them; these brakes were not invoiced to officers, but were considered "repairs," the materials for which I expended.

In the month of March I sent seventy-five blacksmiths, with forges, tools, &c., to White House, on the Pamunkey River, to shoe the animals of General Sheridan's command, returning from the raid around Richmond, and also in the latter part of April sent the same number of blacksmiths to Nottoway Court-House and Petersburg for the same purpose.

In connection with my remarks here, I may add that it is my opinion that the transportation of an army operating in the field can be kept in better repair and at less expense by having a general depot for repairs than by keeping a force of mechanics attached to the different commands.

Many articles were fabricated during the year, the most important of which were the following, viz: Twelve spring wagons, 21,000 pounds horse and mule shoes, 4 sets of ambulance harness, 151 wagon bodies, 1,200 water buckets, 82 office chairs.

In the latter part of February I was ordered to relieve Captain E. E. Camp, assistant quartermaster, at City Point, of all stores appertaining means of transportation, such as horse and mule shoes, nails,