War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0455 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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Numbers 110. QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., September 12, 1865.

Bvt. Major General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Herewith I have the honor to transmit my annual report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. HOWARD,

Brevet Colonel and Assistant Quartermaster.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., August 1, 1865.

Bvt. Major General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: In compliance with your General Orders, Numbers 39, of July 1, 1865, calling for an annual report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, I have the honor to submit the following:

My last annual report was forwarded, in accordance with your General Orders, Numbers 29, of July 6, 1864, on the 26th of September, 1864.

July 1, 1864, I was acting as chief quartermaster of the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, by virtue of General Orders, Numbers 151, War Department, dated March 23, 1864, and Special Orders, Numbers 77, headquarters Army of the Potomac, March 26, 1864.

July 1, 1864, the transportation of the corps was in camp at Old Court-House, near Petersburg, Va., awaiting the return of the command, which had moved to the left of the Army of the Potomac for the relief of the Third Division of the corps, which had met with a severe repulse from the rebels in attempting to destroy the Weldon railroad.

July 2, in camp at the above-mentioned place, the transportation actively employed in conveying supplies of subsistence and forage to the front.

July 3, command returned, when the transportation of the corps was moved to Jordan's Point, on the James River, where a depot was established for receiving and issuing supplies to the command, which, after many hard marches and severe fights, required rest and recuperation.

July 4,5,6,7,8,9, and 10, quartermaster's department engaged in shipping dismounted troops and unserviceable horses to Washington, D. C., and drawing clothing and supplies for the command.

July 11, on my application, I was relieved, by Special Orders, Numbers 54, headquarters Armies of the United States, as acting chief quartermaster Cavalry Corps and ordered to report to Major General W. F. Smith, commanding Eighteenth Army Corps, for duty as chief quartermaster of that corps.

July 14, reported, in accordance with orders, to the commanding general Eighteenth Army Corps, entering on duty as chief quartermaster of the corps. My first business was to inspect the transportation and supplies, and ascertain the general condition of my department. The transportation of a portion of the corps was found in a wretched condition; animals poor, harness out of repair, and a large number of wagons unfit for service; small wagon parks were scattered over a large tract of country, and left almost exclusively under control of non-commissioned officers and citizen wagon-masters.