War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0372 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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Miles.

From Mount Sterling, Ky., via Lexington and Danville,

to Somerset, Ky....................................... 120

From Lebanon, Ky., via Danville and Cumberland Gap,

to Knoxville, Tenn.................................... 216

From Lebanon, Ky., to Burkesville, Ky................. 67

From Lexington, Ky., to Richmond, Ky.................. 26

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Total in operation June 30, 1865...................... 429

RECAPITULATION.

Miles.

Lines in operation June 30, 1864....................... 410

Lines constructed and repaired during the year......... 60

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Total.................................................. 470

Deduct lines abandoned during the year................. 41

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Total in operation June 30, 1865....................... 429

My headquarters have been during the entire year at Danville, Ky. Have engaged in no marches, battles, sieges, or skirmishes. Beyond the steady, uniform assistance I was able to afford the military authorities by supplying them with a quick, reliable means of communication, but little has been required within my jurisdiction. My operation on the lines of the enemy in the months of December, 1864, and January, 1865, in Southwestern Virginia, however, are deserving of mention.

Mr. E. T. Chapman, under my instructions, accompanied Major- General Stoneman on his celebrated raid in the capacity of cipher clerk and operator. The truly valuable assistance he rendered the expedition was duly acknowledged by the second officer in command, Major General S. G. Burbridge. Indeed, there can be little doubt that the entire success of the expedition resulted from the invaluable information as to the position and numbers of the enemy which Mr. Chapman obtained while he held the telegraph office at Bristol. For several hours he held the office while dispatches were passing to and from General Breckinridge and his subordinates, which he creafully copied and laid before General Stoneman. By causing the regular operator at that place, whom he captured in his office, to manipulate the instrument, and dictating to him what should be said, Mr. Chapman was enabled to deceive the operators at Lynchburg and Richmond, and received a long press report from Richmond and gathered much valuable information.

The general condition of the lines under my control was much better at the close than at the commencement of the year. A great deal of pains has been taken in their repairs, and for steady, constant working through all kinds of weather I challenge comparison with any military telegraph lines. One thing in particular I desire to call the department's attention to, and that is the very small cost of maintaining so extended a district as that under my control. Not a man was employed that could be dispensed with nor a dollar expended unnecessarily. When, therefore, the general orders for retrenchment were received I was unable to operate the lines at a less cost than I had been doing.

On the 22nd of June, 1865, I received and order from Colonel Anson Stager, chief of the U. S. Military Telegraph Corps, directing me to turn over my public property and employes to Captain John C. Van duzer, assistant quartermaster and assistant superintendent U. S. Military Telegraphs, Nashville, Tenn., and to relieve Captain W. G. Fuller, assistant quartermaster and asendent U. S. Military Telegraphs, New Orleans, La., and assume the control of the lines in charge of that officer. From the 22nd of June to the 30th of