War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0338 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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And from the July 1, 1865, to September 30, 1865, inclusive:

To the Secretary of War....................... 79

To the Adjutant-General........................384

Miscellaneous..................................837

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Total.........................................1300

Total number from July 1, 1864, to September 30, 1865, as follows:

To the Secretary of War........................219

To the Adjutant-General....................... 794

Miscellaneous................................2.103

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Total...................................... 3.116

GENERAL ORDERS.

Estimated number of general orders received and issued during the year:

During the year. July 1, 1865 too October 1, 1865.

Received. Issued. Received. issued.

Adjutant 124.800 124.177 220.000 10.460

General's

orders

Quartermaste 75.000 53.121 28.800 11.699

r-General's

orders

Total 199.800 177.298 248.800 22.159

July 1, 1864,to September 30, 1865.

Received. Issued.

Adjutant 344.800 134.637

General's

orders

Quartermaste 103.800 64.820

r-General's

orders

Total 448.600 199.457

THE RANK OF OFFICERS OF THE QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT NOT COMMENSURATE WITH THE IMPORTANT SERVICE THEY HAVE RENDERED IN THIS WAR.

It is now a conceded fact that commanding generals owe much of their success to the untiring zeal and determined energy of officers of the Quartermaster's Department.

At the eleventh hour they were ready to accord to officers of this department their just meed of praise for the faithful discharge of onerous and often difficult duties.

Congress to this time has been unmindful of this indispensable enginery to the success of armies and has made no provision for proper reward. The distribution of "brevets," which has been judiciously done by the Honorable Secretary of War, was all that was left for those who have taken or will soon take their places again as citizens. These marks of recognition of their service if promptly ratified by the coming Congress, will cause great gratification and create the thought that those who have remained at home-in the rear-to enjoy the fruits of peace and plenty vouchsafed by victory, while it was being achieved by their constituents, under privations and hardships in the field- at the front-are not wholly incapable of appreciating the relative position of citizen and soldier.

OFFICERS ON DUTY IN THIS DIVISION.

Before this report I would respectfully invite the attention of the Quartermaster-General to the merits of Captain H. A. Royce, assistant quartermaster of volunteers, my assistant in this division. He is a civil engineer by profession, and first entered the service July 20, 1861.