War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0261 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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divisions of the office during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, I have the honor to submit the following tabular statements collected from the tables submitted to this office, in conformity with orders therefrom based upon the circular above referred to:

1. Statement of number of articles on hand and not transferred to the armies for issue June 30, 1864, showing the points at which they were stored.

2. Statement of quantity of material purchased during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, showing the quantity and cost of each kind and where purchased; also total quantity and cost of all.

3. Statement of number of articles of clothing and equipage purchased and manufactured during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, showing the quantity and cost of each kind, where purchased or manufactured; also total quantity and cost of all.

4. Statement of number of articles on hand and most transferred to the armies for issue, June 30, 1865, showing the points at which they were stored.

5. Statement showing the aggregate expenditure for the purchase of clothing, equipage, and material at the purchasing depots of New York, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865.

6. Statement showing quantity of material purchased at the depots of New York, philadelphia, and Cincinnati since May, 1861.

7. Statement showing the number of principal articles of clothing and equipage purchased at the depots of New York, Philadelphia, and Cincinnati since May, 1861.

8. Statement showing the highest and lowest prices paid by the department for articles of clothing and equipage during the past four years of war.

These tables present in compact form the operations of the clothing and equipage division during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1865, and, as far as the reports that have been received to date will permit, the operations during the last four years of war.

The clthe Army during the last fiscal year have been procured by purchase and manufacture at the principal depots of Philadelphia, New York, and Cincinnati, and in relatively small quantities at Saint Louis, Quincy, Ill., Steubenville, Ohio, and at Milwaukee, where the work was distributed among the needy relatives of soldiers in the ranks of the Union Army.

The material required for the manufacture of these large supplies has been drawn from our own markets, and has generally been made from native products.

Although very large demands have been made on the department during the past year, they have in no case exceeded its ability to produce and issue with promptitude the supplies required for the Army in its most extended operations. Perhaps the most prominent instance of the kind was the successful supply of Sherman's army after its triumphant march through the Southern States to the sea-coast, where it found at the right time and in the right places everything needed in this branch of the department.

The articles were shipped principally from the depot at New york upon short notice, and it is due to your own foresight and the promptness and energy of the officers in charge of the clothing and the transportation branches at New York that the success was so complete.