War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0238 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

there has been waste is undeniable, but in the handling of 30,000,000 bushels of grain, and its daily distribution to the manger or nose-bag of every horse or mule in the public service, over a country of 2,000 miles in width, this was unavoidable.

The abstracts with the report of the Fifth Division show, as approximate results, that during the fiscal year there have been supplied to the Army:

Articles. Quantity. Value.

Corn..........bushels.... 5,902,273 $8,558,296

Cats.............do...... 23,794,930 23,794,930

Barley...........do...... 43,311 64,967

Hay............tons...... 407,799 13,049,568

Straw............do...... 10,665 213,300

Feed.............do...... 146 219

Fodder...........do...... 614 304

Forage................... ............. 45,681,584

Fuel for the troops has, generally, in the field, been cut by themselves. At position held for some time and not in the enemy's territory, it is supplied by contract, the labor of troops being employed in different degrees, according as the exigencies of military duty, in the view of commanding generals, will permit.

Fuel for steam-vessels is procured by contract, principally at Philadelphia and Pittsburg.

The report in the Fifth Division show an aggregate of supplies of fuel during the fiscal year of-

Fuel. Quantity. Value.

Wood......................cords....... 336,169 $1,680,840

Coal......................tons........ 832,452 8,324,520

These numbers, however, are imperfect and subject, probably, to important increase upon a complete examination and analysis of the records and reports and accounts of officers.

The reports from the depot of Washington show the issue during the war of-

Corn..............................bushels.............4,500,000

Oats................................do...............29,000,000

Hay................................tons.................490,000

Straw...............................do...................15,000

Coal................................do..................392,000

Wood................................cords...............210,000

Captain E. D. Chapman, forage officer at Saint Louis, reports the purchase of forage at that depot during the war of-

Corn.................................bushels...........3,847,480

Oats...................................do.............17,403,778

Hay...................................tons...............213,216

Straw..................................do..................3,206

But I am of opinion that there have been many purchases of which Captain Chapman cannot have knowledge, and that the quantity actually purchased at that depot is considerably greater than above stated.