War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0196 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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b c g f, &c., main suspending rods in pairs, secured at b and g by wrought-iron plates, and at c and f by cast-iron connecting plates bolted to the chord.

c d and e f, lower suspending rods, secured at c and f to cast- iron connecting plates, and at d and e to horizontal wrought-iron bars; these bars being connected by three small rods d e, d k, and e k, diagonal iron braces, to prevent vertical undulations.

k k, floor girders, ten by fourteen inches, supporting 4-inch by 12-inch joists and 3-inch plank.

d k e k, oak supports, six by ten inches, resting in cast-iron shoes, which are supported by wrought-iron bars d and e.

Lateral braces (not shown in drawing) connect the floor girders to prevent horizontal swaying, and diagonal braces steady the posts d k and e k.

DIMENSIONS.

Entire length, 1,396 feet; entire width, including sidewalks, 31 feet; width of carriage-way in clear, 19 1\2 feet; number of bays, 18; width of bays, 69 to 78 feet; height of piers at low water, 20 feet.

The strains on the different rods were computed as follows: Allowing for a load of 40 pounds per square foot of roadway, 40 pounds per cubic foot of timber, and 60,000 pounds as the breaking weight of iron per square inch, then the greatest strain on the upper suspension rods will be nearly 32,500 pounds.

Pounds.

Breaking weight of same.............................. 90,000

Lower inclined suspension rods, greatest strain...... 16,000

Breaking weight...................................... 46,500

Lower horizontal suspension rods, greatest strain.... 10,200

Breaking weight...................................... 26,000

The entire amount of wrought-iron used, including

bolts, plates, &c., was.............................. 44,068

Cast-iron............................................ 13,586

Narrative from General Tower's reports of February 1 and March 31, 1865, to General Delafield, Chief Engineer.

Nashville was first occupied by our army on the 15th and 16th of December, 1864 [sic]. The officers of the Corps of Engineers commenced to fortify it at that time, and as its importance increased from time to time, by making it the depot for the armies of the West, the labors of the engineers continued, and were not relaxed to the date of the last effort of the rebels to capture it, and thus endeavor to frustrate Sherman's march through Georgia and the Carolina to Virginia. To hold it and check the advance of Hood through Kentucky to the Ohio called forth all the zeal and talent of the engineers. General Tower had been sent thither in September, 1864, and labored to perfect the incomplete defenses. On the advance of the rebel General Hood, and while the army was falling back from Franklin, the necessity for strengthening and completing these defenses became more urgent. He then wrote to the assistant adjutant-general of Major- General Thomas, suggesting that the forces of the Quartermaster's Department might throw an intrenched line over the high hills in advance of the Lorenz house, should it be thought expedient. (See plan Numbers 4.*)

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*Plate LXXII, Map 2, of the Atlas. It appears that the map published in the Atlas omits the numbers designating the hills herein mentioned. For the map containing these numbers, see Executive Document Numbers 1, House of Representatives, Thirty- ninth Congress, first section, Vol. II.

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