War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0156 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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possibly be interpreted by the uninitiated within such period as to be of any service to the enemy, even should the messenger fall into his handsferences to spec of the crops, and having accorded to its members the merit and thanks so well earned by earnest patriotism, by zealous, faithful, and constant exertion to render services throughout the war to their country, and by the success achieved, and having conceded to them the claim that no class of the military was more anxious to be useful, or welcomed with more satisfaction additional duties, we will conclude this report by calling attention to the necessity for additional action, in order to afford in the future to the Army the requisite signal service.

As experience has clearly demonstrated the eminent advantage of having a signal officer attached to garrisons and posts liable to be besieged, a signal officer attached to garrison and posts liable to be besieged, in order to secure communication over the heads of an enemy, should occasion arise, and of having a sufficient number of signal officers as a nucleons that would be immediately available in the event of future wars, it is submitted that such action should be taken by the authorities as would secure for such contingencies the properly instructed officers. This can be done in two modes: Either by continuing a small permanent organization with specifically defined duties or by detailing a certain number of officers from other branches of the service, and directing them to report to the Signal Officer of the Army to be instructed, with a view to their being assigned to such garrisons and posts as it may be deemed necessary to provide with means of signal communication.

If the former mode be adopted it is recommended that a board of officers, more or less acquainted with the past services of this department, be appointed to report the form of the required organization, and to define, as far as practicable, the specific duties to be assigned it, to avoid in the future the great stumbling-block which was left in the way in the past organization, and which, in many instances, crippled the usefulness of the corps by its not being properly understood what it could do or was expected to do.

It is presumed that no argument need be presented in favor of a new organization, as it is self-evident greater interest would be taken in the service, and greater perfection attained in it, than in a simply acting corps.

I have the honor, sir, to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. FISHER,

Chief Signal Officer and Colonel, U. S. Army.

CIRCULAR

WAR DEPT., ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 46.

Washington, October 20, 1865.

ORDERS AND INSTRUCTIONS RELATIVE TO THE MUSTER OUT OF VOLUNTEER TROOPS, VIZ, ALL CAVALRY (WHITE) EAST OF THE MISSISSIPPI, AND CERTAIN VOLUNTEERS IN VARIOUS ARMIES AND DEPARTMENTS.

I. Cavalry east of the Mississippi.

Under paragraph V, General Orders, Numbers 144, Adjutant- General's Office, October 9, 1865, the following regiments of volunteer cavalry-all of that arm remaining in service east of the Mississippi River-