War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0127 UNION AUTHORITIES.

Search Civil War Official Records

garrison our sea-coast works. At its close we practically had no Indian frontier, as the mines of the Rocky Mountains had scattered settlements at numerous points along their slopes, and the force employed in protecting these settlements and the overland routes was double that of the whole Regular Army at the beginning of the war. In view of the vast extent of our country, the recent hostile condition of a portion of it, with the possibility of future local disturbances arising from ill-feeling left by the war or the unsettled questions between the white and black races at the South, I am of the opinion that a Regular Army of 80,000 men is needed, and would recommend the following legislation.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, October 20, 1865.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this department for the past year:

RECRUITING FOR THE REGULAR ARMY.

From October 31, 1864, to October 11, 1865, the number of recruits enlisted, for all arms, is 19,555. (Statement A.)

The recruiting service for the Regular Army is progressing favorably. The regiments suffered so severely in their many battles that they were left at the termination of active hostilities, almost without exception, reduced to mere skeleton organizations. They have now been distributed to stations and are rapidly filling up, thus enabling the department to relieve volunteer regiments as fast as they can be transported to their homes and paid.

There are two principal depots for the general recruiting service, one at Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, for infantry, and one at Carlisle Barracks, Pa., for mounted troops. The officers detailed from the several regiments for recruiting duty are stationed in such localities as give promise of success, and their recruits are sent in parties to the depots, whence they are forwarded to the regiments to which they may be assigned. Besides this, the several regiments recruit their own ranks, as far as practicable, from the country adjacent to their posts.

AUTHORIZED STRENGTH AND ORGANIZATION OF THE REGULAR ARMY.

The authorized strength of the regular regiments of the Army, supposing each company full, is as follows:

Officers Men

6 regiments of cavalry (72 companies) 264 7,248

5 regiments of artillery (60 companies) 273 4,890

10 regiments of infantry, single battalion 340 8,360

(100 companies)

9 regiments of infantry, each 3 battalions 693 21.321

of 8 companies (216 companies)

Total 1,570 41,819

*Remained of this letter (here omitted) relates to the reorganization of the Regular Army.