War of the Rebellion: Serial 126 Page 0046 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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burnt in patches to the extent of one mile and a quarter. Twenty cattle guards, bridge at Mossy Creek (150 feet in length), and one at Morristown (24 feet span) were destroyed. At this point erected two tanks and extended side track for 1,500 feet. From Morristown to Rogersville Junction, or Bull's Gap, the track was destroyed to the extent of three-fourths of a mile. Three bridges of 24 feet span, one of 40 feet span, and one at Russellville of 150 feet span were also destroyed. The line was opened to Bull's Gap on the 25th. Upon reaching that point I received further orders from General Thomas to open the road to Carter's Station, on the Watauga River, twenty miles west of Bristol, which we reached on the 29th of April. From Bull's Gap to Greeneville the mechanical work on the road was very heavy, and all destroyed. Rebuilt a bridge of 100 feet span and renewed 300 feet of trestle-work at Bull's Gap. From thence to Lick Creek the track was uninjured. The bridge and trestle-work at Lick Creek, 900 feet in length, was burnt and the track totally destroyed for seven miles, extending to a point two miles east of Blue Spring. The extensive trestle-work at Swan Pond, two miles east of Lick Creek, 1,400 feet in length and from 9 to 17 in height, was likewise destroyed.

I would here take occasion to express my acknowledgment of the valuable service rendered by Major-General Stanley, commanding Fourth Army Corps, who furnished all the transportation required and large details of men for cutting ties and wood, loading timber, &c.

The laying of the track between Lick Creek and Blue Spring was much retarded by the incessant rains occurring at that time. East of Blue Spring we erected two water-tanks. Between this point and Greeneville we rebuilt three bridges across the Chucky of 140 feet, 100 feet, and 180 feet, respectively; the track was only destroyed to the extent of one-fourth of a mile. Between Greeneville and Carter's Station, which we reached on the 29th of April, there were three bridges destroyed of 245 feet, 137 feet, and 235 feet in length, respectively. Having reached the point to which we were ordered to open the road, the men were set to work cutting timber and ties, surfacing track, &c., whilst awaiting further orders. During the progress of the work upon the main line another force of trackmen were employed at Knoxville in laying a side track 3,000 feet in length to the commissary building in course of erection on the old Charleston railroad. Another large force were engaged lengthening the sidings on the main line of facilitate the passing of trains. The operations of the Fourth Division, of carpenters, and part of the Seventh Division, of trackmen, under charge of John F. Burgin, division engineer, were confined chiefly to the erection of buildings, though frequently employed upon bridges and repairs of track. The rolling-mill was completed and went into successful operation the latter part of March; a report of operations up to the 1st of June I herewith append.

Report of iron manufactured at rolling-mill U. S. military railroads, at Chattanooga, Tenn., to June 1, 1865.

Articles Received. Expended. Manufac- Issued. Balance

tured.

Old iron 2,603,968 2,603,986

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--------

-------

.pounds.

New

railroad

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--------

2,264,320 916,026 1,348,

iron ... 294

.pounds.

Coal.... 59,092 42,262

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16,

830

bushels.