War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 1262 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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We urge this view of the case based upon an actual knowledge that there is in our city a large floating population, with no particular family or business ties or responsibilities, in excess of those who now volunteer, who are holding back with the impression that an immediate enforcement of the draft will be exacted, and they thus be enabled to receive large sums of money as substitutes instead of the very liberal ones now offered for volunteers.

In conclusion, Mr. Secretary, we fell very sensibly the great responsibilities that rest upon you and the constant occupation of your time just at this emergency with matters of great weight and moment to the weal of our beloved country; but, sir, so keenly and honestly are we alive to the fact that we are realy urging a matter which will result in great advantages to the Government, that we cannot close without bespeaking for it your most earnest, thorough, and candid consideration, feeling certain that if, after such canvass, you should feel it consistent with your public duty and the necessities of the Government to grant the petition of the drafted men whom we represent, you would be the personal means of affording an occasion of you and thanksgiving to thousands of now anxious hearts in our great city, that will leave us without a single pang to mar or shadow the great national day of you and thanksgiving about to be ordained and initiated by our respected Chief Magistrate, Abraham Lincoln.

Respectfully submitted.

EDWIN M. HAGERTY,

J. WILSON GREEN,

THOMAS LEARY,

P. H. KEENAN,

PATK. RUSSELL,

Committee of the Board of Councilmen.

TERENCE FARLEY,

W. H. GEDNEY,

GEO. A. JEREMIAH,

MICHAEL NORTON,

Committee of the Board of Aldermen.

LEWIS R. RYERS,

Chairman Joint Committee.

E. W. TAYLOR,

Secretary.

Whereas, the glorious successes of the invincible Arc, which have culminated in the capture of Richmond, the surrender of the rebel Army of Northern Virginia and of General Robert E. Lee, commander-in-chief of the armies of the so-called Confederate States, must inevitably be the precursor of peace, as the rebel army under the immediate command of General Lee, was for the past year, the mainstay and prop of the sinking fortunes of the Southern rebellion; and

Whereas, these successes, following so closely upon the successes of Sherman and of Terry in Georgia, North and South Carolina, which resulted in the capture of all the sea-ports in the rebellious States, must certainly obviate the necessity of enforcing the provisions of an obnoxious conscription act in this city at the time when it is the confident hope and fervent wish of the people of the loyal States, founded upon the triumphs of our armies, that a lasting and honorable peace