War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 1203 UNION AUTHORITIES.

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have been so enlisted and credited, and when and to what States; sand also whether any of said persons so credited are still under guard at Rock Island or elsewhere."

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S BUREAU, Washington, D. C., February 27, 1865.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a resolution of the House of Representatives dated February 25, 1865, wherein the Secretary of War is "directed to inform this House whether rebel prisoners have been enlisted into our service, have received bounties, and have been credited to quotas of one or more States; and if so, how many have been so enlisted and credited, and when and to what States; and also whether any of said persons so credited are still under guard at Rock Island or elsewhere," referred to me for report.

In reply I have the honor to state as follows: The Third Maryland Cavalry, raised under authority form the War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, May 28, 1863, had enlisted for it Fort Delaware 461 rebel prisoners. These men were credited to the State of Maryland. The First Connecticut Cavalry had enlisted for it at Fort Delaware, and credited to the State of Connecticut, in May, 1863, eighty-two rebel prisoners.

All enlistments of said prisoners were stopped by telegram of August 21, 1863, from the Secretary of War; but subsequently authority was issued by the Secretary of War to enlist 120 rebel prisoners for the Third Maryland Cavalry. The foregoing men have been paid U. S. bounty.

Immediately on the completion of the Third Maryland Cavalry it was sent to New Orleans, and has since been serving in the Department of the South [Gulf].

There have been enlisted at Point Lookout, Md., for the First U. S. Volunteers, 1,105 rebel prisoners; for the Second U. S. Volunteers, 379 rebel prisoners.

These enlistments were made under directions from the President. Recruitment for the Second Regiment was stopped, by order of the Secretary of War, in September last. The rebels enlisted at Point Lookout were never credited to any State. Credits and payments of bounties to them were forbidden by the orders of the War Department. By direction of General Grant they were sent to the Department of the Northwest, and have since been serving there.

Under special instructions from the President, 1,750 men, held as rebel prisoners of war at Rock Island, Ill., were, during September and October, 1864, mustered into the military service of the Untied States and credited to Pennsylvania (with the exception of twelve credited to Ohio). They have been paid no bounty by the United States, but were paid local bounties by the places to which they were credited. They were kept under guard, as other recruits are, until organized and sent to the field. On Major-General Pope's application they were ordered to the Department of the Missouri for service in the West.