War of the Rebellion: Serial 125 Page 1092 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

January 30, 1865.

GOVERNOR OF MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo.:

You are authorized by the Secretary of War to raise six regiments of volunteer infantry under the call of December 19, 1864, The period of service will be for one, two, or three years, as the recruits may elect. The said troops should be mustered into service by February 15 next, in order that they may be credited on the quota of the State under the call before the draft commences.

Incomplete regiments which fail to organize within a reasonable time will be consolidated, so as to form and be mustered in with complete regimental organization.

The recruitment, organization, and musters must conform to existing regulations.

The regiments will be for general service wherever required. In raising them no enlistments from the Missouri State Militia or other troops already in the service of the United States will be sanctioned.

JAMES B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

January 31, 1865.

GOVERNOR OF NEW YORK,

Albany, N. Y.:

SIR; I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 25th instant, asking for authority to raise an additional regiment of infantry for duty at Elmira. In reply, I am directed to inform you that the Secretary of War does not deem it best to authorize another regiment under the conditions proposed.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. FRY,

Provost-Marshal-General.

WAR DEPT., PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S BUREAU,

Washington, D. C., February 1, 1865.

Brigadier General E. W. HINKS,

Actg. Asst. Provost-Marshal-General, New York City:

GENERAL: In the accounts of troops called for and furnished, kept in this office, it is shown that various States and districts had on calls prior to that of July last an excess to their credit, resulting, mainly, from the long terms of service for which they put in men.

Under the call of July 18, 1864, men were permitted by law to enlist for one, two, or three years, and the excess above alluded to was in some places increased under that call, and in other places an excess was created on account of both the number of men and the length of the period for which they were accepted.

The acts of Congress and the pledge of the Government require that all the above excesses should be duly considered in distributing the quotas under the call of December 19.

Wherever the quotas assigned under the call of July 18 were not filled by volunteers enlisted, or credits allowed according to acts of